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HALE Course Information

A wide selection of courses are available to graduate students in Educational Administration. A number of the more specialized elective courses and special topics courses are offered on a limited basis, but will typically be taught every two years. Although 800 level courses are typically designed for masters level students, and 900 level courses for doctoral students, most courses are comprised of students from all levels.

EAD 315: Student Leadership

EAD 315 is a three-credit undergraduate course designed to foster individual development and to prepare students to engage in leadership at Michigan State University as well as in their community, career, and organizational activities after graduation.

 

The course is grounded in the perspective that becoming an effective leader is an ongoing process that requires practice and experience. During the semester, students develop and critically reflect on their personal understanding of leadership; examine and evaluate representations of leadership on campus, in the society, and/or their career field; and establish goals and action plans for becoming an effective leader.
Several broad themes are examined in the course, including leadership language; self-awareness, including one's values, ethics, motivations, strengths, and limitations; interculturalism and the importance of a global perspective; communication; decision-making; group dynamics, including followership and power; and adaptability.

EAD 315 is designed as a laboratory course that is graded on a Pass/No Pass scale. Students are expected to both read about and discuss leadership and apply ideas through experiential learning activities. Success in this course requires that students perform satisfactorily on several elements including: active participation & engagement, three written assignments, group work, and in-class presentations, Students from all majors enroll in this course which is recognized as an elective for all degree programs.

Multiple sections of this course are offered each semester. Each section is facilitated by either a full-time University staff member or a graduate student in one of the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education (HALE) programs. These facilitators work with a member of the HALE faculty who serves as the instructor of record and coordinator for EAD 315.

Books used in recent semesters:
Komives, S.R, Wagner, W., and Associates. (2009). Leadership for a better world:
       Understanding the social change model of leadership development, San
       Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Kouzes, J.M. & Posner B.Z. (2012). The leadership challenge: How to make
       extraordinary things happen in organizations,
5th Ed. San Francisco: Jossey-
       Bass.
Rath, T. (2007). StengthsFinder 2.0. New York: Gallup Press.

EAD 362: Student Culture and Higher Education

EAD 362 examines college student cultures at diverse institutional types in the US and other nations using a variety of theoretical lenses and learning experiences. College student cultures might include those based on race and ethnicity, religious/faith tradition, international student status, sexual orientation, and activities including athletics and Greek letter organizations (e.g., fraternities and sororities). The course entails readings and other media, participation in a variety of formats during class sessions, and writing in a variety of formats.

 

Outcomes objectives for student include:

  • Understanding the development and maintenance of college student cultures, including majority and minority group cultures in the US and other nations.
  • Being able to use different theoretical lenses to identify and understand student cultures.
  • Developing strategies for working with student cultures in various higher education capacities (e.g., student affairs, academic affairs, institutional advancement, and teaching).
  • Developing skills to continue to stay current in understanding changing landscapes of student cultures across time and institutional settings.
  • Being able to set personal learning goals, select learning activities that will facilitate reaching the goals, and reflect on progress toward them.

 

Required texts:
There is no required text for this course. Required readings, as noted in the syllabus, are available via download from the D2L class site, except as noted. Students are responsible for locating and downloaded all required readings.

Required Formatting Manual:
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). 2009. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. [known generally as “the APA manual,” this style guide will be used in nearly every EAD course you take].

EAD 363: Diversity and Higher Education

EAD 363 takes an anti-oppressive and critical social justice approach to examine the various concepts and related concepts of equity and diversity in higher education. The course probes the various "isms" (racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, etc.) inside/outside higher education to unpack how social inequities are reproduced from the micro-individual, to the institutional, and to the more macro structural levels within higher education. It draws on literature from multiple disciplines and use various kinds of texts, films, media and online resources, to meet the following objectives:

 

  • Demonstrate an understanding and application of the concepts related to equity and diversity inside/outside US higher education
  • Develop a critical awareness of one’s social positionality (i.e. memberships in various social groups) and understand one’s positions within these relations of unequal power in the context of HE.
  • Think critically about knowledge production
  • Critique, analyze, and complicate contemporary diversity practices and policies in U.S. higher education.
  • Respect and appreciate multiple ways of knowing (i.e. arts based inquiry, meditation, circles, and so on)

Each of these prongs is important to gain the critical self-reflection necessary to be an educator who is knowledgeable of the unique social dynamics—of ethnic, racial, gender, ability, sexuality, religious, and socioeconomic differences— in the education of youth/adults in colleges/universities and broader society in global contexts. One of the core texts used in recent years is: Sensoy, Ö., & DiAngelo, R. J., Is Everyone Really Equal?: An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education.

EAD 491: Special Topics in Student Affairs: Introduction to Student Affairs
EAD 491: Introduction to Student Affairs is a 3-credit, 7 week accelerated course. The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to the field of student affairs in the context of higher education through a combination of readings, projects, and experiential learning opportunities. The course is intended for undergraduates who may be considering entering the field as a campus professional.

Course Foci and Topics: The course will focus on the foundations of the profession, including a brief introduction to history of the field, professional associations, institutional differences, professional and ethical standards, functional areas in higher education, student learning and developmental theory, overview of graduate preparation, and current topics.

As a result of completing this course and its requirements, students will:

  • articulate personal and professional goals beyond their undergraduate work;
  • describe the values of the student affairs profession;
  • identify the multiple roles played by the student affairs educator and the contributions of student affairs to student learning and other goals of higher education;
  • discuss the range of functional areas under the broad umbrella of student affairs and identify areas of particular interest to explore;
  • gain a general understanding of institutional differences and missions;
  • and describe their strengths and skills in relation to their professional futures.

Required Text:
There is no required text for this course. Required readings, as noted in the syllabus, are available via download from the D2L class site, except as noted. Students are responsible for locating and downloaded all required readings.

Required Formatting Manual:

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). 2009. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. [known generally as “the APA manual,” this style guide will be used in nearly every EAD course you take].

EAD 801: Leadership and Organizational Development (HALE M.A.)
In EAD 801 participants examine the concept of leadership and explore what it means to be a leader within the context of education based organizations (i.e. schools, colleges, universities). Special consideration is given to the ways in which organizations develop and the role of leaders in processes of organizational development and change. This process includes the study and analysis of existing literature and research while also encouraging participants to examine these constructs within their own context and as aspects of their own personal and professional identities.

As a graduate level course, the course is constructed on the assumption that participants will enter with some general exposure to the theoretical concepts and/or the actual practice of leadership as well as familiarity, through previous work or personal experience, with some of the dynamics of organizations. This course is intended to provide an introduction to traditional theories of leadership, as well as to introduce more contemporary perspectives and considerations related to leadership and organizational development.

The course is limited in scope to organizational leadership at the institutional level within the United States system of education; however, students are encouraged to consider professional, state/federal, or international leadership for their individual projects. Course materials will draw upon several disciplines including business, management, human development, sociology, and organizational psychological. Work in the course will intersect the areas of administration/management, governance and organizational theory but is not intended to duplicate courses in those areas.

The goal for the course is participants to gain new understandings of themselves as leaders, of the leaders and leadership actions around them and of how to link leadership to valued organizational goals and processes.

Objectives for the course include:

  • Identify and describe the roles and responsibilities associated with leadership within the context of an educational organization
  • Understand organizational development as both a field of study and practice
    Identify situations that necessitate an organizational development approach to leadership
  • Apply principles of leadership and organizational development in specific organizational contexts
  • Assess individual capacity and ability to lead organizational development and change

 

Recent texts used in the course include:
Avolio, B. (2011). Full range leadership development (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA:
          Sage.
Bolman, L.G. & Deal, T.E. (2008). Reframing organizations: Artistry, choice, and
          leadership
(4th ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Gallos, J.V. (2006). Organizational development: A Jossey-Bass reader. San
          Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Heifetz, R., Linsky, M., & Grashow, A. (2009). The practice of adaptive leadership:
         Tools and tactics for changing your organization and the world
. Boston, MA:
         Harvard Business Press.

EAD 805: Administration in Higher Education

EAD 805 introduces students to administrative structures and processes in a postsecondary education context. The primary goal of the course is to help students develop a thorough understanding of how complex organizations, especially colleges and universities, work.

 

Course objectives include:

  • Introducing students to key literature related to the administration of higher education
  • Acquainting students with specialized concepts, models, and theories useful in the administration of higher education
  • Preparing students to think critically and comprehensively about the purposes, achievements, and directions of the U.S. postsecondary education system
  • Enhancing students’ understanding of career options within higher education administration
  • Developing a set of theoretical and analytical tools that aid in students’ professional practices

 

The course examines the goals, purposes, and functions of postsecondary education, varied institutional types, models of organizational operations, and the key internal and external influences that shape the U.S. higher education system. Course readings and assignments are designed to help students build a firm knowledge base and apply this knowledge to address realistic problems in postsecondary education settings. Class interactions are designed to enhance students understanding of the readings and to simulate the types of dilemmas that arise in professional work groups.

EAD 805 serves as an introductory level course in a graduate program that prepares professional staff members for student affairs and other areas of postsecondary education administration. As a professional preparation experience, the course emphasizes professional standards and practices and sets high expectations for student participation, collaboration, performance, and course products. Students who complete this course successfully will be better prepared to function effectively in the complex and dynamic environments of postsecondary education institutions.

Among the texts used in recent years are: R. Birnbaum, How Colleges Work; L. G. Bolman & T. E. Deal, Reframing Organizations; P. G. Altbach, P. J. Gumport, & R. O. Berdahl, American Higher Education in the Twenty-First Century.

EAD 840: Inquiry in Postsecondary Education

EAD 840 offers an opportunity to think and write about ways of knowing in higher education research and practice. The central question posed by this course is: How do we know about higher, adult, and lifelong education? Subsequent questions include: What do we know about how students learn and develop, how faculty and administrators work, how colleges and universities are organized, and how higher education interacts with other aspects of society? This course is a core part of HALE MA curriculum and designed to foster reflection about the numerous research and scholarly papers, chapters, and books students encounter in their academic program as well as about the methods and ways of knowing about professional settings in which students work. Academic and professional experiences involve frequent encounters with studies, reports, and texts that claim knowing something about higher education. This class examines predominant ways of knowing about higher, adult, and lifelong education. This is accomplished by reviewing some of the philosophical foundations underpinning scholarly inquiry as well as some of the common conventions of conducting research and reporting research findings. Although we will be examine the process of inquiry, this is not a course that will teach you how to conduct research. Rather, it is a course that will help you consider you own ways of knowing, situate your inquiry within the field of study, and become an informed and sophisticated consumer of research about higher, adult, and lifelong education.

 

Learning topics in this course include: 1) Forms of knowledge, inquiry and scholarly communication; 2) positivist and post-positivist approaches to inquiry; 3) interpretative, constructivist, and comparative approaches to inquiry; 4) critical approaches to inquiry. In examining these topics students will be exposed to scholarly writing about research and inquiry as well as examples of each type of inquiry. In addition, students will work to situate their beliefs and perspectives within predominant viewpoints on and approaches to inquiry in higher, adult, and lifelong education.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Describe foundational concepts related to scholarly inquiry in the social sciences.
  • Describe major approaches to inquiry in the field of higher, adult, and lifelong education.
  • Identify and analyze the approach to inquiry taken in published research.
  • Critically review and analyze the knowledge claims made in higher education research.
  • Understand the strengths and limitations in research that is used to inform decision-making and professional practice.
  • Position their own interests in inquiry within the predominant ways of knowing and approaches to inquiry within the field of higher, adult, and lifelong education.

 

Texts recently used in this class are: R. Arum & J. Roksa, Academically adrift: Limited learning on college campuses; R. A. Rhoads & K. Szelényi, Global citizenship and the university.

EAD 850: Issues and Strategies in Multicultural Education

EAD 850 provides an introduction to multicultural education using a four-pronged approach that involves the development of: 1) A deeper understanding of the nuances in difference and diversity, and how they are interconnected with issues of privilege, power, and oppression in the personal/professional educational context; 2) A deeper understanding of the interconnections between knowledge production, identity, meaning, and power, and how these play out in educational settings and every day practices; 3) Critical reflection towards existing diversity/multicultural practices and developing strategies to re-imagine these practices in one’s professional context; and 4) Critical policy analysis skills to unpack, challenge, and rewrite existing diversity policies in global contexts.

 

Each of these prongs is important to gain the critical self-reflection necessary to be an educator who is knowledgeable of the unique social dynamics—of ethnic, racial, gender, ability, sexuality, religious, and socioeconomic differences— in the education of youth/adults in both educational settings (K-12 schools, colleges, and universities) and broader society in global contexts.

Among the texts used in recent years are: Sensoy, Ö., & DiAngelo, R. J., Is Everyone Really Equal?: An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education; Sharp, J., Geographies of postcolonialism; Titchosky, T., Disability, self, and society; Willinsky, J., Learning to divide the world: Education at empire’s end. Also the film: Prom Night in Mississippi (Directed by Paul Saltzman).

EAD 860: Concept of a Learning Society

The “Learning Society” is a popular but problematic phrase meant to describe recent developments in education across the life span and to guide institutions and individuals worldwide in their educational goals, programs and activities, and plans for the future. By now, as it is used by many authors and leaders (in education and other domains), the learning society refers to a complex global configuration of opportunities, practices, and possibilities.

An influential use of the phrase “the learning society” can be credited to the famous educational leader and innovator Robert Maynard Hutchins of the University of Chicago and his book The Learning Society (1968). He features as a model the classical Greek Polis, or the ideal of an educated citizenry prepared for active participation in public affairs. An American version can be identified with Thomas Jefferson. For Hutchins, the learning society was an extension of his belief in the possibilities for a democratic culture, in which educational activities of all kinds—those supporting citizenship and the arts, for example—would be seen as a check on the narrowing of education by the demands of the workplace and the professions.

Today, business leaders and theorists (or gurus) of economic and technological organization—particularly in new demands of work--are urging participation in the learning society based on a very different understanding of what the phrase means. Others propose individual growth and development as the cornerstone of the learning society. Still others focus on the learning society as the domain in which technology will provide the essential format for education in schools, in postsecondary education, and for learning everywhere else in the “Digital Age.” Thus, the learning society stands for a combination of historical, organizational, cultural, and technological forces in our time--all deserving critical attention.

The goals of EAD 860 are to explore: 1) what is meant by the learning society as the phrase is used in the US and other nations, or how the phrase has come to mean several things in its brief history (or, the “genealogy” of the learning society); 2) primary domains and activities of the learning society in their historical, social, economic, and cultural contexts; 3) the experiences and views of individuals living and working in the learning society; and 4) what the learning society can mean in the social transformations associated with new information and communications technologies--and resistance to them.

After a general introduction to the many meanings of the phrase “learning society” the course offers opportunities for exploring its different “scenes” or “locations” (at work, at home, in other cultures, online, and more). Expository material and a variety of online resources--audio, video, educational website, museum exhibits, and additional readings--are included in the course units to help students explore the meanings and uses of the primary texts.

EAD 860 is an unusual course in the College of Education’s online MA programs, offered as it is in a self-paced format (*See note below). Students can complete the six course units according to a schedule they set for themselves, within the timeframe of the semester. Needless to say, good planning and steady application are essential to completing the course in a satisfying way.

The course is also unusual in the extent to which it uses hypermedia, or linked online resources in many formats. The units are designed to offer, in the instructor's writing and the links appearing with it, a course-based web of information, opinion, and resources in different media. Students in the course become, in effect, hypermedia readers, deciding what attention and priority to give to the varied resources and what relations to consider among them. The “web” for the course, so to speak, operates as an anchored but mobile network of digital resources for learning, together with the printed books and films. Thus, beyond its attention to questions of the learning society, EAD 860 is intended to contribute to students’ abilities in a form of what is now often called “digital literacy.”

Each of the six course units includes assignments in reading, listening, and viewing. There is also a writing assignment for each unit. Submitting the writing assignment for a unit gains access to the next one. The writing assignment for the last unit serves as the Final Exam. There are no required interactions among students (e.g., postings to discussions or small group projects), though there are opportunities for voluntary ones. Course grades will reflect performance on the written work.

These texts and films have been used in recent offerings of EAD 860:

Atul Gawande, Better: A Surgeon’s Notes on Performance (Picador)
Noah Adams, Piano Lessons: Music, Love, and True Adventures (Delta)
Deborah Fallows, Dreaming in Chinese: Lessons in Life, Love, and Language
          (Walker)
Ken Bain, What the Best College Students Do (Harvard University Press)
William Powers, Hamlet’s BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life
          in the Digital Age
(Harper)
The Visitor (Directed by Tom McCarthy)
Erin Brockovich (Directed by Steven Soderbergh)
The Namesake (Directed by Mira Nair)

*Note: This description is for the course as it is offered regularly by Professor Steven Weiland. The course is also offered occasionally by Professor Riyad Shahjahan, when the texts will be similar but the format will not be the self-paced one described here.

EAD 861: Adult Learning

EAD 861 focuses on developing a better understanding of learning in adulthood and what implications this knowledge holds for helping adults learn in postsecondary and other educational settings. This includes the consideration of adult learning that is both formal (e.g., in classroom-like settings) and informal (e.g., helping patients learn about diabetes self-management or facilitating learning in the workplace). The intent is for this course to be of practical use for students interested in teaching and learning in adult and other postsecondary education settings, as well as those interested in administration and leadership, student affairs and advising, and policy in postsecondary education. Through readings, assignments, discussions, and additional resources participants explore who adult learners are, why they learn, how they learn, and the relationship between learning and development. Given that each of these questions represents a substantial body of scholarly inquiry, this course intends to offer an introduction to each.


Using educational research and theory, popular culture, and the participants' own experiences as educators and learners, we explore (a) historical, psychological, and social foundations of adult learning, (b) developmental influences on adult learning, (c) various theoretical perspectives on how adults learn and (d) what all this means for helping adults learn in formal and informal settings.

 

At the end of this course, participants will demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and understanding of adults as learners;
  • Ability to apply research and theory in designing and implementing learning experiences for adults
  • Understanding of psychological, socio-cultural, and political dimensions of adult learning informing practice
  • Skill in clarifying, defining, and solving practice problems related to adult learning contexts

 

Among the texts used in recent years are:

Mackeracher, D. (2004). Making sense of adult learning (2nd ed.).'

Merriam, S.B. & Bierema, L.L. (2014). Adult learning: Linking theory and practice.
Merriam, S. B., Caffarella, R.S. & Baumgartner, L.M. (2007). Learning in adulthood: A
          comprehensive guide
(3rd ed.).

Tennant, M. & Pogson, P. (2002) Learning and change in the adult years: A
         developmental perspective.

Vella, J. (2002). Learning to listen, learning to teach: The power of dialogue in
          educating adults.

EAD 863: Training and Professional Development

EAD 863: One area of adult and postsecondary education of considerable interest to many individuals and organizations is professional development. Within universities and colleges, faculty members, administrators, and professional staff are expected to continue to improve their expertise and abilities to teach, lead, research, and carry out the multiple missions of the institution. Within workplaces, service, and community-based organizations, employees are expected to engage in on-going improvement through continuing professional education (a.k.a. CE or CPE). Professional development has become even more important in recent years with the increasing pressures on academic organizations and other workplaces for greater evidence of quality work and outcomes.

This course is based on the premise that professional development is a profoundly important activity that involves an individual’s heart, mind, and body. The nature of professional development, however, is also shaped by the social and cultural contexts of organizations and the broader society. At the core of professional development is the idea of lifelong learning, what it means to be a lifelong learner, and the ways in which organizational and societal structures inter-relate such learning.

The course is designed for individuals who hold or in the future will serve in professional roles in which they are responsible for organizing training and professional development opportunities for colleagues. Also the course should help those who work in postsecondary learning settings to plan for and engage in their own professional development. The course is designed primarily as an elective for master’s level students in various disciplines, but may be useful for doctoral students interested in professional development and training.

The purpose of this course is to develop knowledge of and skill in the design, development, and delivery of training and professional development programs for working adults in various occupational settings. In the process, participants examine and unpack multiple understandings about the meaning, purposes, and approaches to professional development in various contexts. This course is not specifically about teaching strategies, adult learning, or program planning (Other courses in our program focus more directly on these aspects of training and professional development). Yet, aspects of each of these topics are relevant to this course.

Participants will develop:

  • Knowledge of the ways in which professional development and training are defined and conceptualized;
  • Knowledge of the purposes professional development activities serve and what theories about human development and organizational purposes guide professional development;
  • An understanding of the values and beliefs that relate to different approaches or perspectives to professional development;
  • Knowledge of how professional development and training differ in various settings and what strategies are most appropriate in which contexts?
  • Skill in using strategies to design and implement professional development within these various philosophical and organizational contexts.


Among the texts used in recent years are:
Branch, R. (2009). Instructional design: The ADDIE approach (6th ed.). New York,
         NY: Springer.
Cranton, P. (1996). Professional development as transformative learning: New
         perspectives for teachers of adults
. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers
Kaiser, L.M.R., Kaminski, K. & Foley, J.M. (2013). Learning transfer in adult
        education: New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, No. 137.
        San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Silberman, M. L., & Auerbach, C. (2006). Active training: A handbook of techniques,
        designs, case examples, and tips.
San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer. ISBN: 978-0-
        7879-7623-1
Vella, J. (2002). Learning to listen, learning to teach: The power of dialogue in
         educating adults
(Revised edition). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Whyte, D. (2001). Crossing the unknown sea: Work as a pilgramage of identity. New
         York: Riverhead Books.

EAD 864: Adult Career Development

EAD 864: Adult career development is a critical part of the life cycle, reflecting: 1) the nature of work in its many forms; 2) opportunities for learning, change, autonomy and collaboration, and leadership; 3) the structure of occupations and professions; and 4) relations between individuals, organizations, and institutions. So too must individual differences be accounted for--like age, gender, and historical or cohort experience--when we think about careers. Accordingly, the study of how adults choose careers and develop in their work requires attention to ideas in several fields of inquiry: education, psychology, sociology, history, biography, communications, and more. There is as yet no widely agreed upon theory of career development that captures its variability and whatever principles are available to guide our understanding of the experiences of individuals and the many forms of work in our world.

In EAD 864 we will study the structure of careers, including theories of career stages, and also key developmental features of work across the life course, focusing on how individuals make their work gratifying and meaningful in organizational and other settings. Our goal is not to discover an ideal or universal scheme for career development--as is the case in many popular books on careers--but to inquire into how individuals have found ways to give meaning to their work.

The course will be unified by a focus on cases of adult career development, with attention also to what can be said (within limits) generally about careers across occupations and professions, including teaching. Thus, the primary activities will be exploring adult career development from two complementary perspectives: 1) individuals reflecting on their work and lives in autobiographical and biographical narratives, and in dramatic films; and 2) adult career development as it is represented in research on work, the professions, and the human life course, and in popular accounts of career choice and change.

EAD 864 is an unusual course in the College of Education’s online MA programs, offered as it is in a self-paced format. Students can earn credit for the course by completing the six units according to a schedule they set for themselves within the time frame of the semester. Needless to say, good planning and steady application are essential to completing the course in a satisfying way.

The course is also unusual in the extent to which it uses hypermedia, or the integration into the course via links many resources beyond the required texts, including video, audio, photography, online exhibits, and more. The course’s six units—each designed around a case of adult career development--are designed to offer, in the instructor's writing and the links appearing with it, a course-based web of information, opinion, and resources of many kinds in different media. Students in the course become, in effect, hypermedia readers, deciding what attention and priority to give to the varied resources and what relations to consider among them. The “web” for the course, so to speak, operates as an anchored but mobile network of resources for learning. Thus, beyond its attention to adult career development, EAD 864 is intended to contribute to students’ abilities in what is now called “digital literacy.”

Assignments and Grades
Each of the six course units includes assignments in reading, listening, and viewing. There is also a writing assignment for each unit. Submitting the writing assignment for a unit gains access to the next one. The writing assignment for the last unit serves as the Final Exam. There are no required interactions among students (e.g., postings to discussions or small group projects), though there are opportunities for voluntary ones. Course grades will reflect performance on the written work.

These texts and films have been used in recent offerings of EAD 864:
Danielle Ofri, Incidental Findings: Lessons from My Patients in the Art of Medicine
         (Beacon)
Linda Greenlaw, The Hungry Ocean: A Swordboat Captain’s Journey (Hyperion)
Walter Isaacson, Steve Jobs (Simon and Schuster)
Parker Palmer, Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation
         (Jossey-Bass).

The Devil Wears Prada, directed by David Frankel (2006), Up in the Air, directed by
         Jason Reitman (2009), or another film chosen from a list in the first cours unit.
The Insider, directed by Michael Mann (1999)
Mr. Holland’s Opus, directed by Stephen Herek (1996)

EAD 866: Teaching in Postsecondary Education

The purpose of EAD 866 is to help participants become more reflective and effective educators in postsecondary contexts, whether online or face-to-face. We address this goal by exploring the following themes: a) different conceptions of teaching; b) characteristics of learners in postsecondary educational settings; c) theories concerning the learning process; d) instructional design and planning; e) strategies to encourage active learning, including strategies involving lecturing, small groups and discussion, experiential learning, and educational technologies; g) approaches to assessing learning; h) approaches to improving teaching through assessment and faculty learning and development.

An underlying assumption explored throughout the course is that the self of the teacher is deeply connected with the process of teaching and therefore with the processes and outcomes of students’ learning. We begin with the view that effective teaching must be considered in terms of specific students, contexts, areas of study, and purposes. That is, we do not seek to define or advocate a particular way of teaching but rather to explore the assumptions, choices, theories, and beliefs that should be considered as a teacher makes choices in particular contexts.

The course is useful to those involved in or interested in teaching in a variety of postsecondary contexts, including, for example, college and university classrooms, student affairs workshops, continuing professional development, and workplace settings.

 

By the conclusion of the course, students should be able to:

  • Articulate a philosophical/theoretical approach to teaching and the values, beliefs, experiences, and ideas that shape one’s philosophical/theoretical approach.
  • Discuss major conceptions of teaching in postsecondary education.
  • Use the research findings concerning students in various postsecondary settings and the theories concerning how learning occurs to make informed teaching choices.
  • Engage in systematic instructional planning and design.
  • Know, select, and use a range of teaching strategies that encourage active, involved learning, and that are appropriate for learners in postsecondary settings and their particular areas of study.
  • Design useful assessments of students’ learning and of teacher effectiveness.
  • Be aware of strategies and resources available for encouraging the professional growth of teachers in postsecondary environments.

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: B. Davis, Tools for Teaching; b. hooks, Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom; R. Menges & M. Weimer, Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Teaching; W. McKeachie, Teaching Tips; P. J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life; Pratt, D.D. and Associates, Five Perspectives on Teaching in Administration and Higher Education; Weimer, M. Learning Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice; J. Vella, Learning to Listen, Learning to Teach: The Power of Dialogue in Educating Adults.

EAD 867: Case Studies in Educational Leadership

EAD 867: Leadership is perhaps one of the topics most written about; a wealth of information is available on the topic, and in this online course, we read but a small portion of this literature. It is also very interdisciplinary, and so our readings reflect a host of disciplinary backgrounds, not just education. Though the contexts may vary, the principles and tenets typically apply regardless of the orientation and work environments of the authors. Assigned readings provide the foundation for class discussions.

The main body of the course is divided into three sections. Each contains assigned readings and a case problem. The readings provide a foundation for understanding different aspects of leadership and for analyzing the case problem. In each section, students critically discuss the readings, discuss the case problem in small groups, and individually write a short analysis of the problem. The final activity for each section is a brief individual learning reflection. The last section of the course is an opportunity for professional reflection in which each member develops and writes an educational leadership philosophy that reflects a deepening understanding of what leadership means to them and to their practice.

Among the texts used in recent years are: Astin, A. W. & Astin, H. S., Principles of transformative leadership. In A. W. Astin & H. S. Astin (Eds.), Leadership Reconsidered: Engaging Higher Education in Social Change; L. G. Bolman, & T. E. Deal, Leading with soul: An uncommon journey of spirit; S. R. Komives, N. Lucas, & T. R. McMahon, A new way of understanding leadership. In S. R. Komives, N. Lucas, & T. R. McMahon, Exploring Leadership: For College Students Who Want to Make a Difference; C. D. Pielstick, The transforming leader: A meta-ethnographic analysis.

EAD 868: Proseminar in Higher and Adult Education (HALE M.A.)

EAD 868 is the required introductory course in the M.A. program in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education (HALE). The term “proseminar” typically refers to a graduate course with limited enrollment. In HALE we have a “proseminar” that introduces the PhD program. Thus, we simply adopted the idea when we revised the HALE MA program a few years ago. Where did the term come from? According to historians of higher education the adjective “professional” was long ago added to the “seminars” offered to undergraduates, and that led to the new term “proseminar” to signify courses for graduate students.

 

Our course features first the history of higher education, or how the past helps us to understand today’s conditions and problems. There will follow attention to the “college idea,” including the relation of liberal education to other parts of the curriculum, and then to questions of teaching and learning in traditional and online classes. We will also study leadership in higher education, and the recent experiences of well regarded college and university presidents. Our work on traditional higher education will be complemented by explorations of lifelong learning, or what adults do to educate themselves for career and personal development. We will study the internationalization (or globalization) of higher education. And we will look at the impact of the digital revolution on essential elements of literacy, access to postsecondary learning, the growth of online courses and programs, proposals for a new system of academic credentialing, and forecasts for the future of colleges and universities.

 

EAD 868 is designed in a self-paced format. Students complete the six online units according to a schedule they set for themselves, within the time frame of the semester. Each of the units includes assignments in reading, listening, and viewing. There is also a writing assignment for each unit. Submitting the writing assignment for a unit gains access to the next one. The writing assignment for the last unit serves as the Final Exam. There are no required interactions among students (e.g., postings to online discussions or small group projects) though there are opportunities for voluntary ones. Course grades will reflect performance on the written work.


The course relies on hypermedia. That means that EAD 868 utilizes many links to online resources: texts, video, audio, online exhibits, and more. The units are designed to offer, in the instructor's writing and the links appearing with it, a course-based web of information, interpretation, opinion, and resources of many kinds in different media. The “web” for the course, so to speak, operates as an anchored but mobile network of resources for learning, together with the printed books and films.

 

These books and films have been used in recent offerings of EAD 868:
Andrew Delbanco, College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be (Princeton University
         Press)

James Banner and Harold Cannon, Elements of Teaching (Yale University Press)

Gary Marcus, Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning (Penguin
         Press)

Diana Oblinger (Ed.), Game Changers: Education and Information Technologies
        (EDUCAUSE)

Declining by Degrees: Higher Education at Risk (Public Broadcasting System;
        Available free online or as a DVD)

Digital Nation (Public Broadcasting System: Available free online or as a DVD)

EAD 870: Foundations of Postsecondary Education

EAD 870 examines major events in the development of colleges and universities in the United States and the philosophical, historical, and social forces that have influenced this development. The course examines contemporary issues in higher education by exploring the intersections of historical, philosophical, and sociological forces that have shaped and continue to shape U.S. higher education, as well as the ways in which higher education has shaped society. International/comparative higher education is also introduced.

 

EAD 870 entails course readings and class preparation, take-home exams, a substantial research paper, and an international/comparative higher education exploration. [Required for SAA master’s students, elective for HALE master’s students, open to students in other graduate programs but not appropriate for most HALE Phd students].

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: J. R. Thelin, A history of American higher education; Gasman, B. Baez, & C. S. V. Turner, (Eds.), Understanding minority-serving institutions; Additional readings come from a variety of historical sources and accounts, as well as websites that address contemporary higher education.

EAD 871: Collegiate Contexts for Teaching and Learning

The purpose of EAD 871 is to help participants consider the meaning of learning and the various contextual factors that influence the learning process in higher education. The course is appropriate for those preparing for roles as student affairs professionals as well as for those who plan to be faculty in higher education settings. The course is organized around four major questions:

What is learning? What does it mean to be educated? Across higher education institutions, administrators and faculty are committed to supporting students’ learning. Focused, thoughtful dialogues about the definitions of learning, what it means to be educated, the outcomes of an effective learning process, and the characteristics of contexts that foster learning will help prospective students affairs professionals, administrators, and faculty members enhance the quality of their work. We will use our course to examine such issues.

What influences learning in the collegiate context? Although learning and teaching are typically associated with the formal classroom, other contexts also are sites for teaching and learning and influence what is learned and the learning process. For example, learning occurs in residence halls, during athletic experiences and social activities, in extra-curricular organizational meetings, in on-line classes, during work experiences, and as students and faculty interact informally. Not only does learning occur in various settings. Learning in higher education is influenced by a variety of contextual factors. These include, for example, the faculty, the institutional type, and the extent and kind of diversity in the educational context. Other factors that can affect learning within the collegiate environment include the extent and kinds of technology with which students interact, opportunities to interact with and be exposed to international students and experiences, athletics, and student activism, opportunities to experience service learning or civic education, the extent to which spirituality is supported in student life, and the architecture and space configurations of the institution.

What kinds of learning environments foster optimal learning? Over the past quarter-century, higher education leaders, faculty, and scholars have become increasingly interested in how to optimize the collegiate learning experience. An extensive body of research has developed that explores the characteristics of effective collegiate learning environments and that highlights the ways in which universities and colleges can interject strategic experiences at various points in students’ collegiate careers—such as during the first year, as part of the general education requirement, or in developmental education-- to strengthen the quality of students’ learning. We will explore the findings from this on-going research, and students will consider the implications of these findings for the institutions where they work (or plan to work).

What does it mean to be an educator within the collegiate context? An underlying assumption that will be explored throughout the course is that the identity, beliefs, and values of educators are deeply connected with the process of teaching and therefore with the process and outcomes of students’ learning. Thus, our work together is designed to provide each participant with the opportunity to become a more reflective professional—one who thinks critically about what learning is, the kinds of learning outcomes to encourage, the various contextual influences on the learning process, and the kinds of learning environments that particularly foster significant learning.

Among the texts used in recent years are: P. Cranton, Understanding and Promoting Transformative Learning; G. D. Kuh, J. Kinzie, J. H. Schuh, E. J. Whitt & Associates, Student Success in College: Creating Conditions that Matter; B. L.Smith, J. MacGregor, R. S. Matthews, and F. Gabelnick, Learning Communities: Reforming Undergraduate Education.

EAD 872: Legal Issues in Higher Education

EAD 872 will provide an overview of key legal issues in higher education today. Topics will include free speech, due process, academic freedom, tenure, student privacy, and affirmative action. Readings will include court opinions, legal and research articles, reports, and opinion pieces. Throughout the course we will consider the realities, challenges, and opportunities faced by higher education as a result of the law, as well as the impact higher education has had on the law.

As a community of scholars, we will explore, discuss, and better understand:

  • The legal system and the impact of legal decisions on higher education;
  • The unique position higher education has within the law;
  • Key legal issues that shape, and are shaped by, higher education;
  • The impact of the law on institutional choices;
  • How we, as educators, can simultaneously operate within the law and in the best interests of our institutions.

Texts used recently in this course:
Alexander, K. W., & Alexander, K. (2011). Higher education law: Policy and
            perspectives
. New York: Routledge.
Bird, L. E., Mackin, M. B., Schuster, S. K. (Eds.). (2006). The First Amendment on
            campus: A handbook for college and university administrators.
Washington,
            DC: NASPA.
Cloud, R. C. (Ed.). (2004). Legal issues in the community college. New Directions for
            Community Colleges, no. 125. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.

EAD 873: College Student Development

EAD 873 examines major bodies of theory related to college student development and the contexts in which that development occurs. The course entails course readings, participation in a variety of formats during class sessions, essay writing, conducting a literature review, a group project, and reflection. As a result of this course, students will:

  • Understand the history and nature of student development theory, how it is and has been created, used, and modified.
  • Interpret and apply theories to understanding the context of students’ development.
  • Develop the ability to locate and synthesize student development literature related to real-world issues in student affairs/higher education practice.
  • Apply existing theory to actual students’ experiences and begin to see additional ways of looking at those experiences through the creation of informal developmental “theories.”
  • Critique what is called “student development theory,” both in terms of individual theories/models and the collective body of literature in the field.
  • Reflect on individual experiences as college students and professionals, integrating self-awareness into their practice as student affairs professionals.

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: N. J. Evans, D. S. Forney, F. M. Guido, L. D. Patton, & K. A. Renn, Student development in college: Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.) and Wilson, M. E. (2011) ASHE reader on college student development theory: ASHE reader series, 2nd Ed.; D. Lipsky, Absolutely American: Four years at West Point; R. Suskind, A hope in the unseen: An American odyssey from the inner city to the Ivy League.

EAD 874: Introduction to Student Affairs

EAD 874 Course purpose and goals: Student affairs personnel are employed in a wide range of institutional types and functional areas. To function effectively in these settings, student affairs professionals must understand the purposes of higher education and the role of student affairs personnel in facilitating learning and personal development among students. Knowledge and appreciation of the history, philosophy, and theoretical underpinnings of the field, as well as current and emerging issues facing higher education are key to working as an educator in student affairs. This course is designed to introduce you to the student affairs profession and the higher education environment in which it functions.

 

As a result of this course, students should be able to:

  • discuss the range of functional areas under the broad umbrella of student affairs and identify areas of particular interest to explore;
  • identify the multiple roles played by the student affairs educator and the contributions of student affairs to student learning and other goals of higher education;
  • understand the relationships between student affairs and other areas of the institution;
  • trace the emergence and development of the student affairs profession and the major philosophies that guide practice;
  • describe the theories and frameworks on which student affairs practice is based;
  • describe the nature of student affairs professional standards and competencies and articulate a professional development plan for advancing personal competency levels;
  • participate in professional dialogues on contemporary issues in the student affairs field; and
  • write concisely, coherently, and analytically, using APA style guidelines.

 

As an introductory course, this experience serves as a foundation from which to start your lifelong learning about the profession and yourself as a student affairs educator.

Among the texts used in recent years are: G. Blimling, E. Whitt & Associates, Good practice in student affairs: Principles to foster student learning; Council for the Advancement of Standards, The book of professional standards for higher education; Readings on-line. The Chronicle of Higher Education. The Publication Manual of American Psychological Association Style Manual, 6th edition.

EAD 875: Issues and Strategies in Student Affairs

This capstone course (EAD 875) is designed to promote the integration of the core curriculum and practitioners’ experiences in the Student Affairs Administration master’s degree program. Students will gain experience in applying theory to practice and demonstrating how theory can inform, strengthen, and support work in higher education.

Learning Objectives: As a result of this course, students should be able to:

  • Apply and extrapolate higher education and student affairs theory to various higher education contexts
  • Learn how to analyze methodically a case study scenario using theory and recommend possible courses of action supported by theory
  • Comprehend how institutional type impacts student affairs work
  • Develop an understanding of traditional and innovative student affairs organizational models and how professional philosophies and actions can support particular models
  • Acquire insight regarding critical issues to successful student affairs and academic affairs partnerships

 

Texts used in recent offerings of EAD 875:
American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication Manual of the American
         Psychological Association
, Sixth Edition. Washington, DC: American
         Psychological Association.
Eimers, M.T. (1999). Working with faculty from different disciplines. About Campus,
         4(1), 18-24.
Hirt, J.B. (2006). Where you work matters: Student affairs administration at different
         types of institutions
. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.
Magolda, P.M. (2005). Proceed with caution: Uncommon wisdom about academic
         and student affairs partnerships. About Campus, 9(6), 16-21.
Manning, K., Kinzie, J., & Schuh, J. (2014). One size does not fit all: Traditional and
         innovative models of student affairs practice
. New York, NY: Routledge.
Steinke Wawrzynski, K., & Jessup-Anger, J. (2014). Building bridges: Using the Office
         Consultation Project to connect students to theory and practice. Journal of
         Student Affairs Research and Practice
, 51(1), 85–97.
Whitt, E. J., Nesheim, B.E., Guentzel, M. J., Kellogg, A. H., McDonald, W. M., & Wells,
          C. A. (2008) “Principles of good practice” for academic and student affairs
          partnership programs. Journal of College Student Development, 49(3), 235-249.

EAD 876: Budgeting and Finance in Higher Education

The purpose of EAD 876 is to introduce students to the fundamentals of higher education finance including: the private and public benefits of higher education, the determinants of cost and price in higher education, the role of the federal government in financing higher education, the role of state governments in financing higher education, the implications of various financing strategies on access and affordability of higher education, and the processes by which resources are allocated within colleges and universities.

Students will examine external sources of funding, internal resource allocation processes, and  social and economic principles and values regarding the distribution of resources among competing concerns.

Students should gain an understanding of the delicate balance between revenues and expenditures and an appreciation for the complex relationship between finance and other aspects of college and university administration.

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • Describe the major higher education revenue sources.
  • Describe the major models of internal resource allocation.
  • Understand and conceptualize the relationship between higher education finance and other administrative functions such as strategic planning, student affairs and services, enrollment management, plant maintenance and operations, & public and government relations.
  • Identify the differences in funding patterns/models between different higher education sectors (2 year and 4 year; private and public).
  • Articulate, analyze, and defend key finance, budgeting, and planning concepts through online discussions.

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: D. E. Heller (Ed). The States and Public Higher Education Policy: Affordability, access, and accountability. 2nd Edition. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press; The College Board. Trends in College Pricing; Desroches, D.M., & Wellman, J.V. Trends in College Spending. Washington, D.C.: The Delta Cost Project.

EAD 877: Program Planning and Evaluation in Postsecondary Contexts

EAD 877 focuses on program planning as both a field of practice and inquiry. As a field of practice, program planning represents a series of activities in which most educators working in postsecondary settings find themselves engaged. As educators, we plan courses and lessons within courses. We design and implement degree and certification programs, as well as advise students on their own academic program plans. At times, we participate in the planning of professional conferences and meetings, design and implement workshops, make presentations to colleagues, practitioners, and to lay audiences.

While these activities vary widely, they all represent a common set of curricular, organizational, and political challenges and decisions that we as educators, either implicitly or explicitly, must make. These decisions and tasks are grounded in particular conceptual, theoretical, social, cultural, and political frameworks that shape and influence the ways in which these decisions and tasks are approached and the eventual nature of programs developed and delivered. Along with questions of effectiveness of processes and approaches, these latter issues suggest the boundaries of program planning as a field of inquiry.

Participants in this course critically reflect on their own beliefs and assumptions about educational program planning. Written, video, and real-world cases are used to foster awareness not only of the technical tasks involved in program planning but the underlying assumptions, values, and forms of rationality that guide the planning process.

In this course, students will develop:

  • Knowledge of the research and scholarship that focus on academic program planning and evaluation in postsecondary education;
  • Skill in the planning, design, and development of educational and training programs for postsecondary education contexts;
  • Critical awareness and understanding of the social and political dimensions of academic program planning, particularly issues of power as they relate to teaching and learning in these settings;
  • A philosophy of program planning and an educational, academic, or training program plan consistent with this philosophy.

 

Among the texts used in recent years are:
Caffarella, R. S. & Daffron, S.R., (2013). Planning programs for adult learners: A
          practical guide for educators, trainers, and staff developers
(3rd Ed.). San
          Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Lattuca, L.R. & Stark, J.S. (2009). Shaping the college curriculum: Academic plans in
          context
(2nd Ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
Posavac, E.J. (2011). Program evaluation: methods and case studies. Upper Saddle
          River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

EAD 878: Education in the Digital Age

EAD 878: It is a commonplace in education today that technology must be accounted for in all domains of teaching, learning, administration, and leadership. The subject is vast and urgent. What must educators at all levels and in all sectors know of the emerging and fast changing digital world?

 

Questions of technology are not particular to one place or another in the educational system. Thus, the subjects addressed in EAD 878 are at the borders of K-12, postsecondary formal education, and informal and continuous learning in adulthood and the workplace. “Education in the Digital Age” applies to learning across the lifespan.

 

The questions behind the course are Historical and Demographic: How did we get here and what is the impact of generational change on the uses of technology and attitudes toward it?; Philosophical and Epistemological: What impact is technology having on how we identify the purposes of education and understand the mind?; Interpretive and Critical: What are the educational gains and losses associated with new technologies and the “new literacies” deriving from them?; and Operational and Practical: What ways of teaching and learning, and what forms of organization and leadership, will capitalize most effectively—for institutions and individuals--on the digital transformation.


The course is designed to: 1) Display as much as possible of a timely and even urgent domain of inquiry and practice, organized around the topics named above; and 2) Present the ways in which educational uses of technology are being debated. Thus, the syllabus represents a critical survey, or a reasonably comprehensive look at education in the digital age conducted in the spirit of criticism, or the examination of ideas and practices by weighing their strengths and weaknesses, variations in use, and consequences (wanted and unwanted) for both institutions and individuals.

 

We are all users of technology in our work and learning; but we also want to know as much as we can about what that means for how we gain and use knowledge, and what a digital view of experience means for behavior and values, for organizations and institutions, and for individuals. Thus, we will study work by leading advocates for the digital transformation of education, like media scholar Henry Jenkins and English professor Cathy Davidson, and those who worry over the consequences of rushing toward the electronic future, like technology writer Nicholas Carr and psychologist Sherry Turkle.


EAD 878 is an unusual course in the College of Education’s online MA programs, offered as it is in a self-paced format. We will use the Desire2Learn, the new learning management system at MSU. Students can complete the six course units according to a schedule they set for themselves, within the timeframe of the semester. Needless to say, good planning and steady application are essential to completing the course in a satisfying way.

 

The course is also unusual in the extent to which it uses hypermedia, including video, audio, online exhibits, and more. That means that EAD 878 utilizes many links to such online resources. The units are designed to offer, in the instructor's writing and the links appearing with it, a course-based web of information, opinion, and resources of many kinds in different media. Students in the course become, in effect, hypermedia readers, deciding what attention and priority to give to the varied resources and what relations to consider among them. The “web” for the course, so to speak, operates as an anchored but mobile network of digital resources for learning, together with the printed books and films. Thus, the format of EAD 878 itself presents questions about the forms of education in the digital age.


Each of the six course units includes assignments in reading, listening, and viewing. There is also a writing assignment for each unit. Submitting the writing assignment for a unit gains access to the next one. The writing assignment for the last unit serves as the Final Exam. There are no required interactions among students (e.g., postings to discussions or small group projects), though there are opportunities for voluntary ones. Course grades will reflect performance on the written work.

 

Resources used in recent offerings of EAD 878:

Henry Jenkins, Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education
          in the 21st Century
(MIT Press; available as a free download)

Allan Collins and Richard Halverson, Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology:
         The Digital Revolution and Schooling in America
(Teachers College Press)

Anya Kamenetz, DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of
         Higher Education
(Chelsea Green)

Dan Cohen and Tom Scheinfeldt (Eds.), Hacking the Academy: New Approaches to
         Scholarship and Teaching from the Digital Humanities
(University of Michigan
         Press; available as a free download)

Diana Oblinger (Ed.). Gamechangers: Education and Information Technologies
         (EDUCAUSE; available as a free download)

William Powers, Hamlet’s BlackBerry: A Practical Philosophy for Building a Good Life
         in the Digital Age
(Harper)

Digital Nation (PBS Frontline, online film and website)

EAD 879: College Student Cultures

EAD 879 examines college student cultures at diverse institutional types in the US and other nations using a variety of theoretical lenses and learning experiences. College student cultures might include those based on race and ethnicity, religious/faith tradition, international student status, sexual orientation, and activities including athletics and Greek letter organizations (e.g., fraternities and sororities). The course entails readings and other media, participation in a variety of formats during class sessions, and writing in a variety of formats.

 

Student outcomes include:

  • Understanding the development and maintenance of college student cultures, including majority and minority group cultures in the US and other nations.
  • Being able to use different theoretical lenses to identify and understand student cultures.
  • Developing strategies for working with student cultures in various higher education capacities (e.g., student affairs, academic affairs, institutional advancement, and teaching).
  • Developing skills to continue to stay current in understanding changing landscapes of student cultures across time and institutional settings.
  • Being able to set personal learning goals, select learning activities that will facilitate reaching the goals, and reflect on progress toward them.

 

Required texts:
There is no required text for this course. Required readings, as noted in the syllabus, are available via download from the D2L class site, except as noted. Students are responsible for locating and downloaded all required readings.

Required Formatting Manual:
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). 2009. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. [known generally as “the APA manual,” this style guide will be used in nearly every EAD course you take].

EAD 881: Workshops in Educational Administration

The topics covered in EAD 881 vary on a yearly basis. Since the spring semester 2012 the HALE program has taken the approach of offering a series of three one-credit workshops instead of offering one three-credit hour course. This provides students an opportunity to examine a variety of current topics or issues that are not specifically addressed in other courses within the curriculum of the HALE degree programs. Students can elect to enroll in all three or just those that are of particular interest. Workshop topics are selected based upon the trends in postsecondary education, faculty perspectives, and students’ expressed interest.

Topics covered in the EAD 881 series since 2012 include:

Community Colleges and Their Students
Community college have become an access point for nearly half of all undergraduate students entering postsecondary education, and yet these two-year institutions are not well understood among the general public, policymakers, or even practitioners in other sectors of higher education. The mission of community colleges is considerably different from comprehensive or research universities and the individuals that attend these institutions are often first-generation students coming from low-income and/or underrepresented groups. This seminar is designed to help students understand community colleges, the important roles they play in the postsecondary system in the United States, the students that enroll in these institutions, and, ultimately, their outcomes. 

Department Level Budgeting
Developing and implementing budgets at the department level has evolved into a critically important skill for postsecondary education administrators. For this reason this seminar will focus on developing awareness and understanding of practical elements such as types of budgets, budgeting cycles, revenue streams, expenses, and resource allocation while also deepening understanding of budgeting as an administrative tool that has structural, political, and symbolic implications.

Helping Skills and Group Dynamics
Postsecondary education professionals are likely to encounter situations, whether with students or colleagues, where there are signs that someone is distressed or the group dynamics appear out of balance. Knowing how and when to intervene in such situations is an important attribute. This seminar is designed to help students perceive and analyze unspoken dynamics in group settings, intervene appropriately to shape group dynamics, learn how to seek expert assistance, and practice effective listening, problem-solving, and decision-making skills.

Exploring Multicultural Competency in the Professional Context
The study of research and theories is important in developing competency around issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Those working in postsecondary education must also possess the skills to apply that knowledge to the environments they move into and the situations they may encounter. This seminar will focus on navigating contextual and cultural nuances that higher education professionals may encounter as they work to create learning environments and establish institutional ethos grounded in acceptance and celebration of differences among people (ACPA & NASPA, 2010)

Working With International Students
Non-immigrant international students represent about 4% of the total enrollment of higher education in U.S. colleges and universities.  This workshop provides an overview of the standard services that institutions provide for these students as well as the professional field that has developed around the offering of these services.  The workshop will cover the legal, cultural, and contextual issues that pertain to hosting international students in the U.S.  It will also include historical trends of international students in the U.S. and how these may be influenced by today’s broader societal or global issues. Upon successful completion, students will have a heightened awareness of this sector of higher education and have assembled an intercultural toolkit of resources and programming initiatives. 

Strategy and Leadership in Higher Education
The higher education landscape is constantly changing. How well institutions adapt to change shapes their direction as well as their organizational units and stakeholders. Institutions must identify opportunities and pursue strategies that align with their mission, as well as institutional, departmental, and unit objectives. In this course, students will identify trends in the external environment, and the factors to consider in planning strategies to respond to opportunities.

EAD 882: Seminars in Higher Education

Note: EAD 882 is a “special topics” course number. With approval of advisor, students may repeat 882 under different instructors and topics. Graduate students from any level (master’s, specialist, doctoral) from any academic program are welcome in the course. With approval of advisor and guidance committee, HALE PhD students can include EAD 882 as one of their three required HALE electives

This course, State and Federal Policy in Higher Education -- recently offered as a section of EAD 882--provides an overview of the relationships between state and federal governments and higher education institutions and systems. We will consider not only how federal and state policies shape colleges and universities, but also how colleges and universities shape federal and state policies. Discussion will include how states and the federal government are structured to create and implement policy. The course will also examine specific higher education policies such as student admissions and financial aid, as well as how the impacts of those policies differentially affect specific sectors of higher education. We will also explore areas where governmental and university polices come into direct conflict, creating implementation challenges for institutions, and how those policies and decisions affect the range of stakeholders involved.

In this course we will explore and better understand:

  • The range of structures that govern higher education institutions and systems;
  • Key policy issues at the state and federal levels that shape, and are shaped by, higher education;
  • The impact of higher education policies on stakeholders as well as on institutional practice;
  • How we as educators, practitioners, and decision makers can operate in the best interests of our institutions (and/or higher education more broadly) with a better understanding of higher education policy.

 

Texts used recently in this course:
Heller, D. E. (Ed.). (2011). The states and public higher education policy: Affordability,
        access, and accountability.
Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. McMillen, W. (2010). From campus to Capitol: The role of government relations in
        higher education.
Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Richardson, Jr., R. C., Bracco, K. R., Callan, P. M., & Finney, J. E. (1999). Designing
       state higher education systems for a new century.
Phoenix, AZ: The Oryx Press.

EAD 889: Research Assessment in Student Affairs

College environments impact students in many ways (e.g., certain environments may empower and facilitate high levels of learning for some students, while other environments may be alienating or stress-inducing). The purpose of EAD 889 is to provide an overview of different quantitative research and assessment techniques while applying Astin’s I-E-O model in student affairs assessment. The use of multiple perspectives will be encouraged to better understand the influence of college and university environments to create positive learning situations for students. The course also provides an introduction to the practice of research and assessment in higher education. Since much of the course credit concentrates on a major assessment project, the goals, assumptions, and important considerations involved in doing a well-constructed project will be discussed.

As a result of this course, students:

  • demonstrate knowledge of select statistical techniques used to understand the relationships among variables and differences between groups;
  • examine selected environmental theories and literature on assessing the influence of collegiate environments on student outcomes;
  • analyze an issue or problem influenced by collegiate environments and conduction of a literature review to inform the investigation of the issue or problem;
  • completef a project studying how the college environment is related to the selected issue or problem; and
  • prepare and present a report of the project including recommendations for future research and practice.

 

Among the texts used in recent years are:
       Astin, A. & Antonio, Assessment for excellence (2nd Ed).
       Pallant, J. SPSS survival manual. (5th ed.)
       Sedlacek. W.E. Beyond the big test: Noncognitive assessment in higher
               education
       Readings on-line; American Psychological Association Style Manual, 6th edition.

EAD 893: Professional Development Seminar in Student Affairs (SAA M.A.)

EAD 893 is a one credit seminar required each semester of a student’s enrollment in the MA program in Student Affairs Administration. Students planning to complete the program in more than four semesters should consult their adviser about the proper time to enroll in 893. Students will engage in a variety of activities designed to explore issues of graduate study and professional preparation for a career in student affairs.

Over four semesters, EAD 893 focuses on transition and socialization into graduate school and the profession of student affairs; professional development; reflection and integration of knowledge, skills, and practice; and preparation for seeking, and making the transition to, a professional position in Student Affairs. Critical self-reflection and the integration of knowledge, skills, attitudes and values are important elements of EAD 893 throughout the four semesters.

EAD 893.01 is restricted for first year SAA MA students and EAD 893.02 is restricted for second year SAA MA students.

EAD 960: Proseminar in Postsecondary Education (HALE Ph.D)

Designed as the first course for doctoral students in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education Program, EAD 960 has three primary purposes: 1) to increase students’ familiarity with history, key concepts, issues, questions, contemporary concerns, and literatures relevant to scholars and practitioners of higher and adult education; 2) to provide information on the doctoral process in the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education Program (HALE) that will help doctoral students successfully navigate their programs; 3) to help entering doctoral students enhance their abilities in the areas of critical reading, critical thinking and analysis, writing, and inquiry.

To accomplish these goals, we engage in a seminar around some central questions facing all those involved in higher education: What are the purposes and roles of higher education institutions in society? What challenges and societal expectations face higher education institutions today? How have the purposes and roles of higher education institutions changed over time? Underlying this course is a recognition that those involved in postsecondary education must grapple with changing contexts and forms for postsecondary organizations, shifting understandings of learning and teaching, and new expectations and challenges confronting teachers, leaders, and administrators in postsecondary settings. In this seminar, each participant develops an understanding of how his or her work in higher education is situated in historical and current contexts.

The Proseminar also encourages students to think about the relationships between theory and practice, and to deepen their knowledge and understanding of scholarly literatures and theoretical perspectives relevant to study of and practice within postsecondary education. Additionally, we focus on various aspects of the process of engaging in research: framing problems, developing research questions, conducting literature reviews, considering design choices. We also focus on approaches to scholarly writing in our field, strategies for inviting and providing peer review and feedback, and skills useful in analytical reading of scholarly work.

Students work to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Develop understanding of the history of American higher education, how postsecondary education is organized as a sector and within organizations, and key issues and challenges confronting leaders and professionals in postsecondary education today.
  • Develop the ability to identify and frame problems and questions within the field of postsecondary education. The study of higher and adult education draws on theories and conceptual frameworks from a variety of disciplines. As we examine selected studies concerning key problems, we will explore how such theories and conceptual approaches frame and guide the way problems are presented and examined.
  • Become familiar with library and web-based resources relevant to professional practice and scholarly inquiry within higher and adult education.
  • Strengthen the ability to read, think, discuss, and write about issues in postsecondary education in a thoughtful, analytical, and critical manner.
  • Develop specific strategies for critiquing and improving one’s own and others' writing.
  • Develop expertise in reading thoughtfully and analyzing and critiquing research articles and reports.
  • Become familiar with HALE faculty members and their areas of interest and expertise.
  • Develop a sense of one’s individual interests and scholarly/professional questions and ways in which to develop a program that addresses those interests and expands one’s scholarly and professional expertise.
  • Prepare a mini-research proposal that includes fundamental elements of a statement of purpose, a critical review of the literature, a conceptual/theoretical framework, and a plan for research methodology and strategies.

Among the texts used in recent years are:

Creswell, J. W. (2014). Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed
          Method Approaches
;
Harper, S. and Jackson, J.F. L. (Eds.). (2010). Introduction to American Higher
          Education
;
Thelin, John. (2011). A History of American Higher Education.

EAD 963: Leadership in Postsecondary Education

The purpose of this seminar is to examine leadership from a broad conceptual and theoretical basis. Leadership is such a seemingly common idea across all sectors of society. We talk about leadership as though it is a clearly understood concept that we all know when we see it. Or do we? We assume it is important in today’s postsecondary institutions, but there is less written about leadership in this sector than in business and industry, or even in the not-for-profit sector. So what do we really know about leadership in postsecondary institutions, and more importantly, what do we need to know?

The literature base for the class is multi-disciplinary, drawing on scholars in sociology, organizational behavior, management, psychology, women’s studies, adult education, and higher education. Seminar participants translate these readings to the postsecondary sector, determining the extent to which context shapes leadership and/or to which leadership shapes organizational context. We analyze the leader from a symbolic perspective, as a manager of meaning, and as a critical change agent. We look at the enactment of leadership as a cognitive, moral and ethical process, and at the leadership challenges facing those in colleges and universities today. We also explore different configurations of leadership (e.g., teams, non-positional leaders, leaders in the middle) and continually challenge the language, images, stereotypes, behavioral and cultural expectations that have come to represent those we label “leaders” and our own roles in perpetuating them. Through dialogue, critical discussion, and the various perspectives found in the readings, we will deconstruct our leadership realities as we prepare to reconstruct who leaders will and need to be in the educational organizations of tomorrow.

At the end of the course, participants will demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and understanding of the multi-disciplinary literature and research on leadership
  • Ability to apply this research and theory to postsecondary institutions
  • A critical examination of one’s assumptions, biases and beliefs about leadership in postsecondary institutions
  • Ability to facilitate a seminar discussion session
  • Ability to engage in critical self-reflection around leadership topics and issues as they relate to one’s lived experiences through class discussion, journal writing, and a final paper


Among the texts used in recent years are: E. G. Bogue, Leadership by Design; R. E. Heifetz, Leadership Without Easy Answers; and a set of required readings.

EAD 964: Comparative Higher Education

EAD 964: Participation in higher education has expanded in many countries around the world and higher education is increasingly seen by policymakers in various countries as central to national economic and social wellbeing. Moreover, while the provision of higher education has long been organized on a national (or sub-national) basis, increased competition, coordination, and interaction across national boarders have resulted in the partial de-nationalizing of higher education. Given these trends understanding higher education on a comparative and international basis has become essential for educational researchers, institutional leaders, and policy makers alike. The purpose of this class is to introduce students to comparative and international higher education research. Major questions asked in the class include: What is comparative higher education? What is the difference between globalization and internationalization in higher education and how have they effected the organization and provision of higher education? What are the major trends effecting higher education on an international basis? How are higher education systems organized differently in different parts of the world? Addressing these questions is achieved by surveying the comparative and international higher education literature and by providing student with the opportunity to engage in inquiry into a comparative or international topic of their choosing.

Specific learning topics include: 1) Use of the comparative method in higher education research; 2) Globalization and internationalization theory in higher education; 3) International student flows and experiences; Global rankings and competition between intuitions on an international basis; Institutional internationalization strategy; Regional study of higher education systems in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. In examining these topics student will be exposed to foundational and contemporary scholarship in the field. Through critical reading, students will work to enhance their understanding higher education in contexts unfamiliar to them and to the contexts in which they are most familiar through comparative analysis.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

  • Describe the benefits and limitations of comparative research in higher education.
  • Analyze how internationalization is effecting higher education institutions and distinguish between internationalization and globalization.
  • Describe major differences between higher education systems in different parts of the world.
  • Critically review scholarship related to international higher education
EAD 965: Diversity and Equity in Postsecondary Education

EAD 965 takes a critical social justice approach to examine the various concepts and related concepts of equity and diversity in higher education. We will probe the various "isms" (racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, etc.) inside/outside higher education to unpack how social inequities are reproduced from the micro-individual, to the institutional, and to the more macro structural levels within higher education. The course takes an interdisciplinary and multinational approach by drawing on literature from multiple disciplines, critical theoretical perspectives (e.g. transnational feminism, queer theory. post/anticolonialism, critical race theory, and disability studies) and contexts beyond the U.S. It draws on various kinds of texts, films, media and online resources, to study our subject. An emphasis is placed on critical reading, writing, and class participation.

The successful student in this course will be able to

  • Demonstrate an understanding and application of the concepts related to equity and diversity inside/outside US higher education
  • Develop a critical awareness of one’s social positionality (i.e. memberships in various social groups) and understand one’s positions within these relations of unequal power in the context of HE
  • Think critically about knowledge production
  • Critique, analyze, and complicate contemporary diversity research, theory, practices and policies in U.S. higher education and elsewhere
  • Respect and appreciate multiple ways of knowing (i.e. arts based inquiry, meditation, circles, and so on)
  • Set personal learning goals, select learning activities that will facilitate reaching those goals, and reflect on progress toward and achievement of those goals.


Among the texts used in recent years are: Sensoy, Ö., & DiAngelo, R. J.’s Is Everyone Really Equal?: An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education and Ahmed S.’s On being included: Racism and diversity in institutional life.

EAD 966: Students in Postsecondary Education

EAD 966 is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a general understanding of theories and research related to student development in higher education. The course allows students to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of theory, how it is created, how it is used, and how it is modified. By reading and analyzing original writings in the field of student development theory, students will have the opportunity to study the philosophical bases of the field as well as to understand the complementarities - and differences - among and between traditional and emerging theories.

 

Course readings incorporate research on the experiences of students of diverse backgrounds, providing information and theory relating to specific identity-based groups of college students such that we develop a deeper understanding of the broad range of college students, both those more similar to us and those more different. We will also explore how environments can enhance or retard student development. Students should expect that this class will be a community of learners and that a strong focus will be on a practical application of student development theory such that it becomes a natural part of our thinking and our work; and to create new and transformative theories, models, and ideas about how college students develop, psychosocially, cognitively, and in terms of their identities.

Goals: That all of us in this class will be a community of learners and that we will accomplish the following:

  • Develop a deeper understanding of the nature of theory, how it is created, how it is used, and how it is modified.
  • Study and understand particular dimensions (e.g., race, social class, sexual orientation) of identity development and how they are a part of a student’s overall development.
  • Study and understand student growth and development during college and the role of college in promoting it.
  • Develop a deeper understanding of ourselves, as it is who we are that is the filter for how we see students and how we use theories.
  • Develop a deeper understanding of the broad range of college students, both those more similar to us and those more different.
  • Learn how environments can enhance or retard student development.
  • Gain skill and comfort with applying developmental theories and constructs to our work with students.
  • Become knowledgeable and comfortable with student theories and its application such that it becomes a “natural” part of our thinking and our work.
  • Develop new and transformative “theories,” models, and ideas about how college students develop, grow, and learn.


Among the texts used in recent years are: J. Braxton, Reworking the student departure puzzle; E.T. Pascarella & P.T. Terenzini, How College Affects Students: A Third Decade of Research, Volume 2; A. Levine & J.S. Cureton, When hope and fear collide: A portrait of today's college student; W. E. Sedlacek, Beyond the big test: Noncognitive assessment in higher education; R. Suskind. A hope in the unseen: An American odyssey from the inner city to the ivy league; V. Tinto, Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition; M.E. Wilson, & L.E. Wolf-Wendel, (2005). ASHE reader on college student development theory.

EAD 967: Policy Development and Analysis in Postsecondary Education

Course Description & Goals

This course follows two complementary strands of inquiry: policy development in postsecondary education and policy analysis. As a community of scholars, we will explore, discuss, and better understand:

 

  • the policy process as it operates in higher education in the United States;
  • concepts and theoretical frameworks for understanding higher education policy;
  • current policy issues being debated at the institutional, state, and federal levels;
  • how policy issues at different levels interplay to produce varying policy outcomes; and
  • the role that policy analysis and research play in the policy process.

 

To engage with these course goals, students will use a case-based approach to propose and assess solutions to a specific policy problem in postsecondary education. Serving as the capstone core course in the Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education (HALE) doctoral program, completion of the four HALE core courses is required before enrolling in this final core course.

EAD 968: Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum in Postsecondary Education

NOTE: In recent years, EAD 968 has been taught at times by either Professor John Dirkx or Professor.Riyad Shahjahan. Thus, there are two distinct course descriptions.

 

Dr. Dirkx's course description

EAD 968 investigates the interrelated topics of teaching, learning, and curriculum in postsecondary educational settings. Students examine the historical and philosophical foundations of curricular issues and study teaching and learning processes from different analytical perspectives and within various international contexts. The goal of the course is to provide students with a strong background for designing educational experiences, planning educational programs, and conducting research on a variety of teaching and learning-related questions. Students should achieve the following learning objectives by the end of the course:

  • Understanding distinctive perspectives on teaching, including the beliefs and assumptions under girding each perspective and the implications of each perspective for educational practice.
  • Understanding of several curriculum frameworks, including assumptions associated with different frameworks and key elements that should be included in a curriculum.
  • Familiarity with historical and international trends in teaching and curriculum development, and recurring debates around the purposes of teaching and learning.
  • Development of a position concerning recent critiques and recommendations regarding curricular issues in American postsecondary education.
  • Ability to implement basic principles of curriculum design.
  • Knowledge of a variety of teaching strategies and how to implement these strategies.
  • Analytical knowledge of current issues of importance in the postsecondary sector pertaining to teaching, learning, and curriculum.
  • Improved skills as an analytical reader of research and conceptual writing concerning teaching, learning, and curricular issues.
  • Enhanced writing and instructional skills.

 

The course operates as a collaborative learning community where all participants are co-learners who support one another’s learning. Class sessions are interactive and usually involve discussions about assigned readings as well as opportunities to apply educational concepts and models to resolve realistic educational problems and challenges. As class members gain knowledge and experience, they play an increasingly significant role in planning and guiding class activities. At the conclusion of the semester, student teams take full responsibility for developing, leading, and assessing an entire class session. This task encourages students to apply and test the principles of good educational practice they study throughout the semester.

Among the books used in recent years are: Lattuca, L. R., & Stark, J. S. (2009). Shaping the college curriculum: Academic plans in action (Second Edition); Tagg, J. (2003). The learning paradigm; Merriam, S. B. and Associates (2007). Nonwestern ways of learning and knowing. Bok, D.. (2006). Our underachieving colleges: A candid look at how much students learn and why they should be learning more; S. Ambrose et. al., How learning works: 7 research-based principles for smart teaching.

Dr. Shahjahan's course description

EAD 968 provides an opportunity for participants to deepen and complicate their understanding of key questions concerning learning, curriculum, and teaching in postsecondary education. It provides the conceptual and contextual underpinnings of the practice of teaching, learning and curriculum (i.e. addressing “why” questions rather than “how to”). While the bulk of our readings will focus on four-year institutions, it is the intent of this course to consider these questions within the broader context of postsecondary education, including community colleges, minority serving institutions, adult education, and workplace learning. We will also consider these issues within online learning programs, and how we might address these issues with a more international perspective.

Students should achieve the following learning outcomes by the end of the course:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with key philosophical perspectives and theoretical approaches to learning in education and understand how they manifest, influence and shape our understandings and decisions regarding postsecondary learning, curriculum and teaching.
  • Demonstrate the ability to question dominant Western notions of learning and pedagogy and push back the boundaries of professional understanding.
  • Describe how the shift to a learning paradigm is manifest at the institutional organizational level in postsecondary education and the challenges/limitations with such reform efforts.
  • Use the academic plan model to analyze the complex environment of curricular and instructional decision-making in postsecondary education.
  • Analyze contemporary curricular debates and reform efforts within the context of historical and cultural conversations about postsecondary curriculum in the U.S. and elsewhere.
  • Use basic principles of curriculum planning to analyze and improve curricular and instructional decision-making in postsecondary education.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with key issues in in the improvement of postsecondary teaching, including strategies to foster active learning and learning-centered environments; the interrelationship of technology with teaching and learning; and various approaches to addressing assessment and accountability.
  • Demonstrate awareness of the key administrative and political issues facing efforts to reform curriculum and instruction in postsecondary education.
  • Demonstrate awareness of issues surrounding learning, teaching and curriculum in higher education with the advent of globalization on U.S. higher education and global contexts.
  • Demonstrate skills as an analytical reader of research and conceptual writing concerning teaching, learning, and curricular issues in postsecondary education.
  • Conduct independent research in the field and write about learning, curriculum, and teaching issues in postsecondary education in a scholarly manner.
  • Demonstrate group working skills in terms of co-authored writing, providing/receiving feedback, and planning/implementing an instructional session.
  • Respect and appreciate multiple ways of knowing (i.e. arts based inquiry, conceptual mapping, meditation, circles, and so on)

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: Lattuca, L. R., & Stark, J. S., Shaping the college curriculum: Academic plans in context (Second Ed.); Tagg, J., The learning paradigm; Graff, G. & Birkenstein, C.,They say I say: The moves that matter in academic writing (2nd ed.); and Belcher, W., Writing Your Journal Article in Twelve Weeks: A Guide to Academic Publishing Success.

EAD 969: Pedagogical Issues in Postsecondary Education

NOTE: In recent years, EAD 969 has been taught at times by either Professor Roger Baldwin or Professor.John Dirkx. Thus, there are two distinct course descriptions.

 

Dr. Baldwin's course description: Issues in the Academic Profession

The academic profession forms the very heart of higher education. Colleges and universities would lose their core purpose without students. Similarly, they would have no means of production or delivery without faculty members. Hence, students of higher/postsecondary education must understand the academic profession if they are to comprehend the workings and future direction of higher learning both in the United States and globally.

Although the academic profession can trace its roots back many centuries, its modern form is relatively new. The academic profession as we know it emerged late in the 19th century and has continued to evolve as higher education has grown, adopted new roles, and expanded its mission in society. Many forces continue to shape the academic profession and a host of current issues are under discussion within and outside the ranks of the professoriate. This course will focus on key issues that are challenging and reshaping the academic profession as we know it.

The course operates as a seminar where each participant plays a crucial role. Classes are discussion oriented. All participants function as co-learners. Dialogue and debate are the responsibility of all class members.

Course learning objectives include:

  • Knowledge of perennial and current issues shaping the faculty experience and transforming faculty work and careers in postsecondary education.
  • Comprehension of the faculty career development process and the nature of distinct phases of academic life.
  • Understanding of the values, traditions, and mores of the academic profession.
  • An appreciation of how context (e.g., institution, discipline) shapes faculty work and careers.
  • Knowledge of the historic evolution of the academic profession as a basis for understanding forces that will shape the profession’s future.
  • Identification of potential research topics concerning the academic profession.

Among the readings used in recent years are: M. Burgan, What Ever Happened to the Faculty?; Schuster, J. A., & Finkelstein, M. J. (2006). The American faculty: The restructuring of academic work and careers; Gappa et al., (2007). Rethinking faculty work: Higher education’s strategic imperative; Kezar, A., & Sam, C. (2011). Understanding non-tenure track faculty: New assumptions and theories for conceptualizing behavior. American Behavioral Scientist, 55(1); Sadao, K. C. (2003). Living in two worlds: Success and the bicultural faculty of color,” Review of Higher Education, 26(4).

Dr. Dirkx's course description: Developmental and Transformative Dimensions of Adult Learning

 

In recent years, the idea of lifelong learning has shifted dramatically from the ranks of empty platitudes to actively guiding policy and practice across a wide range of institutions and international contexts. Much of this attention focuses on the critical importance of continuous learning in adulthood.

 

Approximately one of every two students now enrolled in higher education is 25 or older and, in some institutions like community colleges, career colleges, online programs, and graduate schools, adults make up the majority of the student population. Even the idea of the “emerging adult” suggests a reframing of what we have heretofore called “traditional students.”

 

Beyond formal schooling, adults are increasingly expected to continue learning in areas related to their work, their personal lives, and civil society. From Southeast Asia to Europe, Africa, and North and South America, the policies and practices of local, provincial, and national governments reflect and embrace a vibrant conception of lifelong learning. These learning contexts provide developmental and transformative opportunities for adults. Understanding what this means ands its implications for helping adults learn are the major foci of this course.

This advanced doctoral seminar focuses on an indepth study of the developmental and transformative dimensions of adult learning in individual, group, and organizational contexts (both face-to-face and online), and the implications of this research for policy and practice in higher and adult education. We will address such questions as:

  • How might we understand learning within the context of individual lives?
  • What do we understand to be the transformative dimensions of adult learning?
  • In what ways do developmental transitions influence and shape the nature and meaning of learning in adulthood?
  • What does learning as a group mean? How is this different from individual learning in a group context?
  • What do we mean by organizational learning? Do organizations learn or merely individuals within organizations? If so, how does this occur?

Within individual, group, and organizational contexts, our inquiry will examine:
Developmental influences on adult learning.
Psychological and socio-cultural theories of how adults learn.
Transformative dimensions of adult learning.

Among texts used in recent years are: T. Hart, From information to transformation; D Whyte, Crossing the unknown sea; C. Hoar, Handbook on adult development and learning; E. Taylor and P. Cranton, The handbook of transformative learning: Theory, research, and practice; L. Stapley, Individuals, groups, and organizations beneath the surface: An introduction.

EAD 970: Organization and Administration in Postsecondary Education

EAD 970: The purpose of this core doctoral course it to provide students with a foundational background in organizational theory and to provide analytical tools for applying theory to scholarship and professional practice. This is accomplished by asking questions such as: How do context and environment influence the way we think about the structure and function of an organization? What role does culture play in shaping organizational behavior? How do administrators manage modern postsecondary organizations? Can individuals create change in organizations? Why are management and change strategies effective in one organizational setting and futile in another?

The course considers a variety of literatures and examines many theories and concepts as tools for understanding complex academic environments. A centerpiece of the class is discussion and debate about the merits of these ideas and theories for describing and explaining the realities experienced in postsecondary institutions. In the process, class deliberations seek to make conscious the theories that guide our actions and shape our understandings. As a result, one outcome of taking the course is a deeper understanding of your own (possibly changing) viewpoint and a better appreciation of others' views.

 

At the end of the course, students will demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and understanding of organizational theory and research
  • Ability to critically examine organizational theory and research, and its applicability to postsecondary institutions
  • Understanding of the factors that affect how complex postsecondary institutions function
  • Skill in analyzing postsecondary case problems and situations
  • Ability to ground one’s analysis in the organizational literature

 

Among the texts used in recent years are: Morgan, G., Images of Organizations; W.R. Scott, W.R. & Davis, G.F., Organizations and Organizing: Rational, Natural, and Open Systems Perspectives; Bastedo, M.N., The Organization of Higher Education: Managing Colleges for a New Era.

EAD 972: International and Comparative Issues in Higher and Adult Education

The overall purpose of EAD 972 is to develop knowledge of and skill in comparative approaches to the study of higher and adult education. The course provides an opportunity for all members to become familiar with a comparative analytic framework and to apply this framework experientially within specific areas of higher or adult education that are of interest to them. These areas may include policy, organizational structure, curriculum, and pedagogical practices. Through the study and experience of difference across two countries, participants will engage in a critical and reflexive examination of their professional identity and will closely examine and interrogate the ways in which this identity has been and continues to be constructed.

These goals are addressed through both didactic and experiential components that are intended to augment each other. The didactic component consists of a series of face-to-face seminars at MSU and in our host country, online collaborative study, and self-directed study.

The experiential component consists of a two to three week study tour during which time we visit various educational institutions within our host country. During these visits, we talk with administrators, faculty members, and students. These visits are intended to represent the continuum of educational practice within the host country, but will focus primarily on institutions of higher and adult education. In addition, the experiential component will also involve cultural visits that represent both the historical traditions and the nature of change within the country.

Among the texts used in recent years are: Arnov, R. F. & Torres,C. A., Comparative education: The dialectic of the global and the local (Third Edition). Hussey, T. & Smith, P., The trouble with higher education: A critical examination of our universities; . Deardorff, D.K.and de Wit, H., The SAGE Handbook of International Higher Education.

EAD 995: Research Practicum in Educational Administration

EAD 995:The Research Practicum, a required course for all doctoral students in the College of Education, is intended as the final course in the research sequence. The purposes of the Research Practicum are: (1) to guide students toward preparation of a dissertation proposal; and (2) to enable students to engage in a research experience within a community of scholars. The course is intended as a time of intensive work and major progress on the dissertation proposal. The expected course outcome for each student is a solid, full draft of the proposal of at least 7,000 words. Although further refinement is likely to be needed after conclusion of the course, the product submitted for the course should include a description of the problem and research question and their significance, a thorough literature review, a statement of theoretical or conceptual perspectives informing the study, and a plan for conducting the research. Participants in the course, along with the instructor, constitute a Community of Scholars for purposes of meeting and providing feedback and encouragement to each participant. Approval to enroll in EAD 995 requires that the student provide evidence to the advisor of sufficient preparation for the course and readiness to make significant progress on a dissertation proposal.