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Grant Information for Faculty

Click link for useful grant information for faculty members.

Foundation Opportunities:

Other Funding Opportunities:

Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

National Science Foundation (NSF)

SciVal Database

Selected External Grant Announcement

Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood

Letter of Intent Deadline: May 1, 2018
The Caplan Foundation for Early Childhood supports innovative projects and programs with the potential to significantly enhance the development, health, safety, education, and/or quality of life of children from infancy through five years of age.
To that end, the foundation provides funding in the areas of early childhood welfare, early childhood education and play, and parenting education.
1) Early Childhood Welfare: Children can only reach their full potential when all aspects of their development — intellectual, emotional and physical — are supported. Providing a safe and nurturing environment for infants and preschoolers is essential, as is imparting to them the skills of living in a culturally diverse world. To that end, the foundation supports programs that research best child-rearing practices and identify models that can provide creative, caring environments in which all can children thrive.
2) Early Childhood Education and Play: Research shows that children need to be stimulated as well as nurtured early in life if they are to succeed in school, work, and life. That preparation relates to every aspect of a child’s development, and everywhere a child learns — at home, in childcare settings and in preschool. The foundation seeks to improve the quality of both early childhood teaching and learning through the development of innovative curricula and research based pedagogical standards, as well as the design of imaginative play materials and learning environments.
3) Parenting Education: To help parents create nurturing environments for their children, the foundation supports programs that teach parents about developmental psychology, cultural child-rearing differences, pedagogy, issues of health, prenatal care, and diet, as well programs that provide both cognitive and emotional support to parents.

 

Spencer Foundation Small Research Grants

Deadline: May 1, 2018
The Small Research Grants program is intended to support education research projects with budgets of $50,000 or less. In keeping with the Spencer Foundation’s mission, this program aims to fund academic work that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived.
Historically, the work we have funded through these grants has spanned, a range of topics and disciplines, including education, psychology, sociology, economics, history, and anthropology, and they employ a wide range of research methods. The following examples of recently funded small grants illustrate the diversity of what we support:
• an experimental study of how college students use visual representations in solving math problems
• a study exploring the process of racial and rural identity formation among African American high-school students who attend de facto segregated schools in the rural South
• a mixed-methods study focusing on the different types of knowledge novice and experienced teachers draw on in teaching for reading comprehension

 

William T. Grant Foundation Inequality Research

Deadline: May 2, 2018
In recent years, inequality in the United States has become increasingly pervasive. At the same time, prospects for social mobility have decreased. The William T. Grant Foundation believes the research community can play a critical role in reversing this trend.
To that end, the foundation is accepting applications in support of research projects designed to advance understanding in the area of inequalities in youth development and/or increase understanding of how research is acquired, understood, and used, as well as the circumstances that shape its use in decision making.
Through its Research program, the foundation will award grants of up to $600,000 in support of research that focuses on ways to reduce disparities in academic, behavioral, social, and economic outcomes for youth. Priority will be given to projects related to inequality related to economic, racial/ethnic, and language background, but research that explores other areas will also be considered based on a compelling case for its impact.

 

National Institute of Justice – Comprehensive School Safety Initiative, Fiscal Year 2018

Deadline: May 7, 2018
The Comprehensive School Safety Initiative (CSSI) funds rigorous research to produce practical knowledge that can improve the safety of students and schools. The CSSI is carried out through partnerships between researchers, educators, and other stakeholders; including law enforcement, behavioral and mental health professionals, courts, and other justice system professionals. Projects funded under the CSSI are designed to improve school safety knowledge that can be applied to schools and school districts across the nation, for years to come.
This solicitation includes five funding categories with different expectations and requirements to accomplish the purposes of the CSSI:
Category 1: Developing Novel and Innovative School Safety Programs, Practices, and Strategies
Category 2: Demonstration, Evaluation, and Validation Tests for School Safety
Category 3: Expanding the Use of Effective Interventions Through Scaling-Up
Category 4: Research on School Safety
Category 5: Translation and Dissemination of Comprehensive School Safety Initiative Findings

 

NSF – Computer Science for All (CSforAll:RPP)

Deadline: May 9, 2018
This program aims to provide all U.S. students the opportunity to participate in computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT) education in their schools at the preK-12 levels. With this solicitation, the National Science Foundation (NSF) focuses on researcher-practitioner partnerships (RPPs) that foster the research and development needed to bring CS and CT to all schools. Specifically, this solicitation aims to provide high school teachers with the preparation, professional development (PD) and ongoing support that they need to teach rigorous computer science courses; preK-8 teachers with the instructional materials and preparation they need to integrate CS and CT into their teaching; and schools and districts the resources needed to define and evaluate multi-grade pathways in CS and CT.

 

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWFJ) Evidence in Action Program

LOI Deadline: June 1, 2018 3:00 PM
RWJF will award up to $2.5 million through the program, with the majority of funding dedicated to research that is either specific to disadvantaged children and families, or that will benefit these groups.
The purpose of this call for proposals (CFP) is to improve our understanding of the Action Area 1 drivers* and outcomes related to health, well-being and equity, particularly with respect to disadvantaged children and families. A current lack of empirical evidence limits our ability to identify strategies with the potential to “drive” this Action Area forward. In addition, although these drivers are strongly correlated with individual health outcomes, we lack compelling evidence of the causal directions and the magnitudes of effects on health, well-being, and equity.
We seek evidence on the extent to which Action Area 1 drivers—mindsets and expectations, sense of community, and civic engagement—can be changed through intervention at the individual or population levels to result in better health, well-being and equity outcomes.
An ideal study to provide such evidence would experimentally manipulate a driver, measure changes in that driver, and then measure resulting health impacts. However, we recognize that a variety of constraints could preclude such a design within the parameters of this funding opportunity. Thus, we have established two key aims for funding under this CFP:
• Aim 1: To test the effects of specific interventions on the Action Area 1 drivers, in order to determine the extent to which they can be changed; and
• Aim 2: To establish evidence of causal relationships between Action Area 1 drivers and health outcomes.
While projects that can achieve both aims are preferred, we also anticipate funding research that addresses either of the aims independently. In addition, we hope to support research that can assess the potential of drivers to “move the needle” on health, well-being, and equity outcomes for children and families by examining Action Area 1 drivers within the context of underlying and structural determinants of health.
Researchers are not limited to the specific terminology used here to define the drivers. We will consider projects that apply broad interpretations of what drivers could embody, and that propose novel ways to conceptualize or frame drivers within the Action Framework. Moreover, achieving a Culture of Health involves multiple factors working interactively in complex systems. It is therefore appropriate to think about Action Area 1 drivers not in isolation, but rather as part of these dynamic systems, in which synergy may exist among multiple drivers.
Preference will be given to applicant organizations that are either institutes of higher education, public entities or nonprofit organizations that are tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, but other types of nonprofit and for-profit organizations are eligible to apply. Applicant organizations must be based in the United States or its territories. While the principal investigator is not required to hold an advanced degree, the applicant team must demonstrate the ability to conduct the proposed research.

 

U.S. Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII): Education Innovation and Research Program

Early-Phase Grants CFDA Number 84.411C

Expansion Grants CFDA Number 84.411A

Mid-phase Grants CFDA Number 84.411B

Deadline: June 5, 2018
Purpose of Program: The Education Innovation and Research (EIR) program, established under section 4611 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as amended (ESEA), provides funding to create, develop, implement, replicate, or take to scale entrepreneurial, evidence-based, fieldinitiated innovations to improve student achievement and attainment for highneed students; and rigorously evaluate such innovations. The EIR program is designed to generate and validate solutions to persistent educational challenges and to support the expansion of those solutions to serve substantially larger numbers of students.
The central design element of the EIR program is its multi-tier structure that links the amount of funding that an applicant may receive to the quality of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the proposed project, with the expectation that projects that build this evidence will advance through EIR’s grant tiers: ‘‘Early-phase,’’ ‘‘Mid-phase,’’ and ‘‘Expansion.’’ Applicants proposing innovative projects that are supported by limited evidence can receive relatively small grants to support the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of the practices; applicants proposing projects supported by evidence from rigorous evaluations, such as an experimental study (as defined in this notice), can receive larger grant awards to support expansion across the country. This structure provides incentives for applicants to: (1) Explore new ways of addressing persistent challenges that other educators can build on and learn from; (2) build evidence of effectiveness of their practices; and (3) replicate and scale successful practices in new schools, districts, and States while addressing the barriers to scale, such as cost structures and implementation fidelity. See more in hyperlink….

 

NSF - Perception, Action & Cognition (PAC)

Deadlines:
June 15, 2018 (Workshop and Conference)

August 1, 2018 (Research)
The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas related to typical human behavior with particular focus on perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include (but are not limited to) vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, written and spoken language, spatial cognition, motor control, categorization, reasoning, and concept formation. Of particular interest are emerging areas, such as the interaction of sleep or emotion with cognitive or perceptual processes, epigenetics of cognition, computational models of cognition, and cross-modal and multimodal processing. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic and neural-inspired computation, ecological approaches, genetics and epigenetics, nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, and a variety of methodologies spanning the range of experimentation and modeling. The PAC program is open to co-review of proposals submitted to other programs both within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate and across other directorates.
Note: Proposals may be returned without review if the major focus is 1) the organization of neural activity or brain networks; 2) understanding clinical populations; or 3) non-human animals without a clear and direct impact on our understanding of human perception, action, or cognition. Investigators are encouraged to send the program director a one-page summary of the proposed research before submitting a proposal, in order to determine its appropriateness for the PAC program.

 

NSF – STEM + Computing K-12 Education (STEM+C)

Deadline: July 2, 2018
An innovative science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computing (STEM+C) workforce and well-educated citizenry are crucial to the Nation's prosperity, security and competitiveness. Preparation for the future workforce must begin in the earliest grades from preK-12, where students need to learn not only the science and mathematics central to these areas, but also how computational thinking is integral to STEM disciplines. Because of the powerful innovation and application of computing in STEM disciplines there is an urgent need for real-world, interdisciplinary, and computational preparation of students from the early grades through high school (preK-12) that will provide a strong foundation for mid-level technical careers and for continuing education in higher education. This is particularly important in the key science areas described in the National Science Foundation’s Big Ideas for Future NSF Investment. The STEM+C program supports research and development proposals related to new approaches to pre-K-12 STEM teaching and learning related to Harnessing the Data Revolution, Convergence Research and the Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier.
The STEM+C Program focuses on research and development of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to the integration of computing within STEM teaching and learning for preK-12 students in both formal and informal settings. The STEM+C program supports research on how students learn to think computationally to solve interdisciplinary problems in science and mathematics. The program supports research and development that builds on evidence-based teacher preparation or professional development activities that enable teachers to provide excellent instruction on the integration of computation and STEM disciplines. Proposals should describe projects that are grounded in prior evidence and theory, are innovative or potentially transformative, and that will generate and build knowledge about the integration of computing and one or more STEM disciplines at the preK-12 level.
A proposal submitted to this program description should describe the integration of computing with one or more STEM disciplines. A proposal may focus on studies on the effects of integrating computational thinking with STEM disciplines or the challenges of implementing these potentially disruptive educational interventions. Proposed projects may develop models, assessments, and technological tools to support teaching and learning in this area as well as conduct research on these models, assessments, and tools.
Outcomes of projects should enable the Nation to have a future workforce with knowledge of computational thinking integrated with STEM disciplines, and students prepared and interested in careers in the skilled technical work force or further education and science careers.

 

William T. Grant Scholars

Deadline: July 5, 2018 3:00 PM
The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand junior researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take such risks, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as an emphasis on community and collaboration.
Scholars Program applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. Proposed research plans must address questions of policy and practice that are relevant to the Foundation’s focus areas.
We fund research that increases understanding in one of our two focus areas:
• programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and
• strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth.
We seek research that builds stronger theory and empirical evidence in these two areas. We intend for the research we support to inform change. While we do not expect that any one study will create that change, the research should contribute to a body of useful knowledge to improve the lives of young people.

 

NSF – Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER)

Due: July 18, 2018
CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from early-career faculty at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

 

NSF – Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

Deadline: August 8, 2018
As the nation continues to expand the horizon of opportunities and possibilities through advances in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), the need for a more diverse and well-prepared STEM workforce is also expanding [1]. The challenge of preparing citizens for the expanding workforce and the changing workplace environments calls for new innovations in STEM education [2]. ITEST is a research and development program that supports projects to promote PreK-12 student interests and capacities to participate in the STEM and information and communications technology (ICT) workforce of the future. The ITEST program supports research on the design, development, implementation, and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in technology-rich experiences that: (1) increase student awareness of STEM occupations; (2) motivate students to pursue appropriate education pathways to STEM occupations; or (3) develop disciplinary-based knowledge and practices, or promote critical thinking, reasoning skills, or communication skills needed for entering STEM workforce sectors. ITEST projects may adopt an interdisciplinary focus that includes multiple STEM disciplines, focus on a single discipline, or focus on one or more sub-disciplines. The ITEST program supports projects that provide evidence for factors, instructional designs, and practices in formal and informal learning environments that broaden participation of students from underrepresented groups in STEM fields and related education and workforce domains. Projects that actively engage business and industry partners to better ensure that PreK-12 experiences foster the knowledge and skill-sets needed for emerging STEM occupations are strongly encouraged.

 

Russell Sage Foundation Social Inequality Research

Letter of Inquiry deadline: August 20, 2018
Invited full proposal deadline: November 15, 2018

The Russell Sage Foundation's program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States.
Examples of the kinds of topics that are of interest include but are not limited to economic well-being, equality of opportunity, and intergenerational mobility; the political process and resulting policies; psychological and/or cultural change; education; labor markets; child development and child outcomes; neighborhoods and communities; families, family structure, and family formation; and other forms of inequality.
Two-year grants of up to $150,000 will be awarded to qualified organizations.
The foundation encourages methodological variety, but all proposals should have well-developed conceptual frameworks and designs. Analytical models should be specified and research questions and hypotheses should be clearly stated. Awards are available for research assistance, data acquisition, data analysis, and investigator time for conducting research and writing up results.

 

NSF – Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program

Deadline: August 28, 2018
The National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science (including engineering and computer science) teachers. The program invites creative and innovative proposals that address the critical need for recruiting and preparing highly effective elementary and secondary science and mathematics teachers in high-need local educational agencies. The program offers four tracks: Track 1: The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships and Stipends Track, Track 2: The NSF Teaching Fellowships Track, Track 3: The NSF Master Teaching Fellowships Track, and Track 4: Noyce Research Track. In addition, Capacity Building proposals are accepted from proposers intending to develop a future Track 1, 2, or 3 proposal.

 

NSF – International Research Experiences for Students (IRES)

Deadlines:
September 11, 2018
Second Tuesday in September, Annually Thereafter
Track - I: IRES Sites
September 18, 2018
Third Tuesday in September, Annually Thereafter
Track-II: Advanced Studies Institutes
September 25, 2018
Fourth Tuesday in September, Annually Thereafter
Track - III: New Concepts in International Graduate Experience

The International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program supports international research and research-related activities for U.S. science and engineering students. The IRES program contributes to development of a diverse, globally-engaged workforce with world-class skills. IRES focuses on active research participation by undergraduate or graduate students in high quality international research, education and professional development experiences in NSF-funded research areas.
The overarching, long-term goal of the IRES program is to enhance U.S. leadership in research and education and to strengthen economic competitiveness through training the next generation of research leaders.
This solicitation features three mechanisms; proposers are required to select one of the following tracks to submit their proposal.
Track I focuses on the development of world-class research skills in international cohort experiences. Track II is dedicated to targeted, intensive learning and training opportunities that leverage international knowledge at the frontiers of research. Track III calls for U.S. institutional partnerships and coalitions to develop and evaluate innovative models for high-impact, large-scale international research and professional development experiences for graduate students, as individuals or groups.

 

NSF – EHR Core Research (ECR)

Deadline: September 13, 2018
The EHR Core Research (ECR) program of fundamental research in STEM education provides funding in critical research areas that are essential, broad and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following focal areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM.
The ECR program is distinguished by its emphasis on the accumulation of robust evidence to inform efforts to (a) understand, (b) build theory to explain, and (c) suggest interventions (and innovations) to address persistent challenges in STEM interest, education, learning, and participation. The program supports advances in fundamental research on STEM learning and education by fostering efforts to develop foundational knowledge in STEM learning and learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, for all groups, and from the earliest developmental stages of life through participation in the workforce, resulting in increased public understanding of science and engineering. The ECR program will fund fundamental research on: human learning in STEM; learning in STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and research on broadening participation in STEM.

 

NSF – Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Education and Human Resources (IUSE: EHR)

Deadlines:
October 1, 2017 - October 1, 2018
Exploration and Design Tier for Engaged Student Learning & Institution and Community Transformation
October 1, 2018 - September 30, 2019
Exploration and Design Tier for Engaged Student Learning & Institution and Community Transformation
December 11, 2018
Development and Implementation Tier for Engaged Student Learning & Institution and Community Transformation

Beginning in FY 2018, there will be no single date deadlines for Exploration and Design proposals, which may be submitted at any time from October 1, 2017 onward. Please note however that proposals received after May 1 will be held over to the subsequent financial year for possible award (for example awards will be made in FY 19 for proposals received after May 1, 2018).
The fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) hold much promise as sectors of the economy where we can expect to see continuous vigorous growth in the coming decades. STEM job creation is expected to outpace non-STEM job creation significantly, according to the Commerce Department, reflecting the importance of STEM knowledge to the US economy.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) plays a leadership role in development and implementation of efforts to enhance and improve STEM education in the United States. Through the NSF Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) initiative, the agency continues to make a substantial commitment to the highest caliber undergraduate STEM education through a Foundation-wide framework of investments. The IUSE: EHR program is a core NSF undergraduate STEM education program that seeks to improve the effectiveness of undergraduate STEM education for both majors and non-majors. The program is open to application from all institutions of higher education and associated organizations. NSF places high value on educating students to be leaders and innovators in emerging and rapidly changing STEM fields as well as educating a scientifically literate populace. In pursuit of this goal, IUSE: EHR supports projects that have the potential to improve student learning in STEM through development of new curricular materials and methods of instruction, and development of new assessment tools to measure student learning. In addition to innovative work at the frontier of STEM education, this program also encourages replications of research studies at different types of institutions and with different student bodies to produce deeper knowledge about the effectiveness and transferability of findings.

 

The Center For Ethics & Education

Deadline: November 6, 2018
The Center for Education and Ethics announces a new grant program. The Center will make awards of up to $40,000 for research projects in philosophy as it relates to educational policy and practice. We encourage applicants to understand educational policy and practice in broad terms, including issues that directly relate to K-12 schools and higher education institutions, but also concerning policies that influence children’s growth and development in the family and other institutions. We also encourage diverse kinds of philosophical research ranging from the highly abstract to the highly applied.


U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and National Institutes of Health (NIH) – NIH Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) (R25)

Deadline: July 9, 2019
The NIH Research Education Program (R25) supports research education activities in the mission areas of the NIH. The over-arching goal of this NIGMS R25 program is to support educational activities that complement and/or enhance the training of a workforce to meet the nations biomedical, behavioral and clinical research needs. To this end, this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages the development of innovative educational activities for pre-kindergarten to grade 12 (P-12), pre-service and in-service teachers (Teachers) and students from underserved communities with a focus on Courses for Skills Development, Research Experiences, Mentoring Activities, Curriculum or Methods Development and Outreach. To accomplish the stated over-arching goal, this FOA will support creative educational activities with a primary focus on Information on current SEPA projects can be found at: https://www.nigms.nih.gov/Research/crcb/sepa/Pages/default.aspx and http://nihsepa.org. Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with the SEPA Scientific/Research Contact to be advised on the appropriateness of the intended P-12 STEM or ISE project for SEPA program objectives and the priorities of the NIGMS.


Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. believed effective change should make an impact from the start, yet carry long into the future. To do both, he earmarked a portion of his estate and the eventual sale of his beloved Buffalo Bills to fund his namesake foundation. The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation began operations in 2015 to continue his legacy—one of generosity and innovation, healthy risk taking and collaboration, and an unshakeable community focus.

The Foundation’s geographic focus is Southeast Michigan & Western NY State.  The Foundation defines SE Michigan as:  Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, Washtenaw, St. Clair and Livingston Counties.  The Foundation’s policies state that “Programs located outside of these regions are generally not encouraged.”  What this means, as a practical matter, is that any successful MSU requests will need to be based on activity and relationships within the counties listed.

Wilson Foundation Program areas:

  • Children and Youth: For kids, we’re looking for opportunities beyond K-12 education to provide more pathways to success. Here, we focus on strengthening young minds and bodies with early childhood initiatives, sports and youth development programs, and after school programs.
  •  Young Adults and Working Class Families: Often weighed down by heavy demands and limited resources, working class families and young adults can often miss out on career opportunities. We will invest in skills training and education that can lead to pathways to good paying jobs and increased independence.
  • Caregiving: The role of caregiver can be demanding and overwhelming. Here, we support and honor those who care for others – whether paid or voluntarily – through efforts that provide needed skills, resources, education and respite. Early opportunities will focus primarily on those caring for older adults and seniors.
  • Health Communities: A thriving community starts with the well-being of its people. Here, we will seek opportunities to support: community design and access to space, and programs that support healthy living; improving non-profit productivity and innovation; and economic development levers that spur regional growth, innovation and equity.

There is no deadline, applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The foundation has indicated that all MSU inquiries and applications should route to Lawrence Wallach, Associate Director of MSU Corporate & Foundation Relations.

 

Internal Grant Announcements

Internal Grant Programs in the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies (VPRGS)

The Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies (VPRGS) maintains a list of up-to-date internal grant funding opportunities at Michigan State University.

 

Internal Funding administered by the Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI)

More information on internal funding from the Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI).

International Studies and Programs Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies - MSU in Turkey

Michigan State University faculty and alumni in Turkey are active and supportive of several formal linkages with educational institutions, Turkish and Turkic language course offerings, study abroad programs and international research initiatives in Turkey.

MSU Technologies – The Targeted Support Grant for Technology Development (TSGTD)

Awards funded by VPRGS on a continuous basis.

The OVPRGS has allocated new funding in FY 2016-2017 to support Targeted Support Grants for Technology Development (TSGTD). TSGTD awards are intended to accelerate the commercial development of inventions, technologies and copyright materials within the entire MSU intellectual property estate. Support is targeted to address narrow, specific technology “gaps”, to better establish proof of concept, and to enable key, go-no go decisions concerning the potential for commercial application. As such, these awards may enhance or create business opportunities including licensing, marketing, new company creation or other business development efforts within the MSU Innovation Center (http://innovation.msu.edu).

Proposals are submitted by MSU Technology Tech Managers in collaboration with faculty inventors. Eligibility for TSGTD funding requires:

  • evidence of secure IP (submitted or issued technology patents)
  • completion of formal technology screening or full commercial assessment evidencing commercial potential, if not specific market options. This process is initiated routinely upon submission of an invention disclosure.

TSGTD applications are accepted and immediately reviewed at any time throughout the year. Nominations are jointly prepared by inventors and MSUT Tech Managers and submitted to a Research Review Committee convened by the OVPRGS to facilitate confidential peer review by selected internal (MSU) or external expert panels. This approach allows immediate evaluations and funding decisions on a continuous basis. This offers the advantage of avoiding extended time delays inherent in other internal or external grant programs. The TSGTD review process ensures confidentiality to both applicants and expert referees and protects against disclosure of IP.

Award categories range from flexible, short term projects conducted within MSUT (Category A – $5,000 -$10,000), to more complex short or long term research projects involving MSU inventors (Category B/C – $10,000 - $100,000), as well as projects involving co-investments ($ or in-kind) by commercial partners (Category D – $75-150,000). Projects within Category D have high priority based on the commitment of commercial customers willing to share risks of development.

IRTL Seed Grants

The College of Education’s Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning has funds to support either projects that are likely to lead to larger funded projects or small research projects. The goal of the “seed” grants is to enable COE faculty to develop research grant proposals and to increase their likelihood of successfully competing for research funds. However, research projects that stand alone will also be supported.