W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Woodrow Wilson Michigan Teaching Fellowship - Teacher Education

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WKKF-WW Michigan State University
W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Woodrow Wilson
Michigan Teaching Fellowship

 
WKKF-WW Faculty & Staff

Charles Anderson
Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin
andya@msu.edu

Charles (Andy) Anderson is a professor of teacher education whose research centers on the classroom teaching and learning of science. He studies how students' prior knowledge, language, and social relationships affect their engagement in science learning and the development of scientific literacy. His current work focuses on learning progressions leading to the development of environmental science literacy.
Kristen Bieda
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
kbieda@msu.edu

Kristen Bieda is an assistant professor of mathematics education. Her research focuses on classroom practices related to reasoning and proof in middle grades and secondary mathematics, with the goal of informing teacher education, curriculum, and professional development programs. Other interests include the use of lesson study in teacher preparation and the development of pre-service teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching through the use of curriculum as well as video-based representations of teaching.
Amelia Gotwals
Ph.D., University of Michigan
gotwals@msu.edu

Amelia Gotwals is an assistant professor of teacher education. Her research centers on the teaching and learning of science and the role of assessment in this process. She specifically focuses on inquiry-based constructivist learning environments and on methods and frameworks for translating inquiry-based practices in science classrooms into authentic and meaningful assessment tasks.
Gail Richmond
Ph.D., University of Connecticut
gailr@msu.edu

Gail Richmond is an associate professor of teacher education. Her research focuses on three areas. The first involves the question of scientific reasoning, and the impact of such reasoning ability on science achievement and career choices, such as research or science teaching. She is particularly interested in understanding better how the instructional context – from the university classroom to research apprenticeship experiences – can shape the development of such reasoning. The second focus is on identifying the critical knowledge and skills for effective science teaching and how two factors, an individual's perceptions and commitments as a developing teacher (professional identity) and the classroom and school context, shape this development of such knowledge and skills. She is particularly interested in how such development unfolds for those preparing to be teachers in high-need urban contexts, and how our understanding of this process might inform instruction which will support candidates who have such commitments and yield greater engagement and achievement in science by the students they teach. Her third focus is on understanding better those elements that allow teacher growth to occur within professional learning communities (PLCs), as well as the process by which these changes occur and may result in changes in classroom practice.