Master of Arts in Literacy Instruction - Teacher Education

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Master of Arts in Literacy Instruction Michigan State University
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Science Faculty & Staff


Alicia Alonzo
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology
alonzo@msu.edu
Alicia Alonzo is an associate professor of teacher education. Her research focuses on tools and knowledge for science teachers’ formative assessment practices. She is interested in learning progressions – descriptions of increasingly sophisticated ways of thinking about a topic – and associated assessment tasks as tools for formative assessment. She is currently involved in video-based studies of and efforts to support teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge.
Charles Anderson
Ph.D., University of Texas-Austin
andya@msu.edu
Charles (Andy) Anderson is a professor of teacher education whose research centers on the classroom teaching and learning of science. He studies how students' prior knowledge, language, and social relationships affect their engagement in science learning and the development of scientific literacy. His current work focuses on learning progressions leading to the development of environmental science literacy.
Ann E. Austin
Ph.D., University of Michigan
aaustin@msu.edu
Ann E. Austin is associate dean for research and professor of Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education at Michigan State University, where she has twice been selected to hold the Mildred B. Erickson Distinguished Chair. Dr. Austin’s research concerns faculty careers and professional development, organizational change in higher education, teaching and learning in higher education, doctoral education, reform in STEM education, the academic workplace, equity and inclusion in academe and higher education in the international context. She is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the past-president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), and she was a Fulbright Fellow in South Africa (1998). She is a founding co-PI/Leader of the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL), funded by the National Science Foundation, and was the principal investigator of an NSF-funded ADVANCE PAID grant to study organizational change strategies that support the success of women scholars in STEM fields. Her work is widely published, including Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence: Current Practices, Future Imperatives (2016); Rethinking Faculty Work: Higher Education's Strategic Imperative (2007) and Educating Integrated Professionals: Theory and Practice on Preparation for the Professoriate (2008), as well as other books, articles, chapters and monographs concerning higher education issues in the United States and in international contexts. In 2011, she wrote a commissioned paper for the Board on Science Education of the National Research Council entitled “Promoting Evidence-Based Change in Undergraduate Science Education.” She has worked with colleagues at the national and institutional levels on higher education issues in a number of countries, including Australia, China, Egypt, Finland, Malaysia, Oman, Thailand, the Philippines, South Africa, the United Arab Emirates and Vietnam.
Angela Calabrese Barton
Ph.D., Michigan State University
acb@msu.edu
Angela Calabrese Barton is a professor in teacher education. Her research focuses on issues of equity and social justice in science education, with a particular emphasis on the urban context. Drawing from qualitative and critical/feminist methodologies, she conducts ethnographic and case study research in urban community- and school- based settings that targets the science teaching- learning experiences of three major stakeholder groups: upper elementary and middle school youth, teachers learning to teach science for social justice, and parents engaging in their children’s science education. She also engages in curriculum research and development that links nutrition and science literacies in the upper elementary and middle school classroom. She is currently co- editor for the Journal of Research in Science Teaching.
Melanie Cooper
Ph.D., University of Manchester
mmc@msu.edu
Melanie Cooper is the Lappan-Phillips professor of science education, and is jointly-appointed to the College of Education and the College of Natural Science. Cooper's research focuses on evidence-based approaches to improving chemistry education. One of the prime outcomes of this research is the development and assessment of evidence-driven, research-validated curricula.
Amelia Gotwals
Ph.D., University of Michigan
gotwals@msu.edu
Dr. Amelia Wenk Gotwals is an Associate Professor of Science Education in the Department of Teacher Education. As a former middle and high school science teacher, she has a particular interest in exploring the ways that students learn to engage in science practices with core ideas in science and the ways that curricular and assessment materials interact with teacher instruction to support this learning. She specifically focuses on researching the learning progressions students take as they develop more sophisticated understandings and ways of assessing this complex learning. She was the co-PI on an NSF grant, Deep Think, that developed and tested a learning progression and associated curricular and assessment materials that supported 3rd-5th grade students’ reasoning about issues in biodiversity. She was the PI on the NSF-funded project, Learning Progressions in Science (LeaPS), which organized the first national conference on learning progressions and she is the co-editor of the LeaPS book that emanated from this conference. She was also the PI of the Formative Assessment for Michigan Educators (FAME) project that explored how a statewide professional development program can support teachers in developing formative assessment practices.
Joseph Krajcik
Ph.D., University of Iowa
krajcik@msu.edu
Joseph Krajcik is Lappan-Phillips Professor of Science Education and director of the CREATE for STEM Institute. A former high school chemistry and physical science teacher, Krajcik spent 21 years at the University of Michigan before coming to MSU in 2011. During his career, he has focused on working with science teachers to reform science teaching practices to promote students’ engagement in and learning of science. He was principal investigator on a National Science Foundation project that aims to design, develop and test the next generation of middle school curriculum materials to engage students in obtaining deep understandings of science content and practices. He served as head of the Physical Science Design Team to develop the Next Generation Science Standards. Krajcik, along with Professor Angela Calabrese Barton from MSU, served as co-editor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Krajcik has authored and co-authored curriculum materials, books, software and over 100 manuscripts, and makes frequent presentations at international, national and regional conferences. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has served as president of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST), from which he received the Distinguished Contributions to Science Education Through Research Award in 2010.
Gail Richmond
Ph.D., University of Connecticut
gailr@msu.edu
Gail Richmond is a professor of teacher education. Her research focuses on three areas. The first involves the question of scientific reasoning, and the impact of such reasoning ability on science achievement and career choices, such as research or science teaching. She is particularly interested in understanding better how the instructional context – from the university classroom to research apprenticeship experiences – can shape the development of such reasoning. The second focus is on identifying the critical knowledge and skills for effective science teaching and how two factors, an individual's perceptions and commitments as a developing teacher (professional identity) and the classroom and school context, shape this development of such knowledge and skills. She is particularly interested in how such development unfolds for those preparing to be teachers in high-need urban contexts, and how our understanding of this process might inform instruction which will support candidates who have such commitments and yield greater engagement and achievement in science by the students they teach. Her third focus is on understanding better those elements that allow teacher growth to occur within professional learning communities (PLCs), as well as the process by which these changes occur and may result in changes in classroom practice.
Christina Schwarz
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley
cschwarz@msu.edu
Christina Schwarz is an associate professor of teacher education. Her research centers on teaching and learning science. She specifically focuses on inquiry-oriented, modeling- centered constructivist learning environments from preschool through college. Her research involves helping students and teachers develop an understanding of scientific practices such as scientific modeling and helping them learn how to productively engage in those practices. She is also conducting research with beginning teachers around noticing and responding to open up spaces for students' scientific sense-making. Other interests include teacher development, educational technology, science teaching and learning in urban schools, science curriculum development, and social/cultural practices in the classroom.
David Stroupe
Ph.D., University of Washington
dstroupe@msu.edu
David Stroupe is an assistant professor of teacher education. He also serves as the associate director of STEM Teacher Education at the CREATE for STEM Institute at MSU. He has three overlapping areas of research interests anchored around ambitious teaching practice. First, he frames classrooms as science practice communities. Using lenses from Science, Technology, and Society (STS) and the History and Philosophy of Science (HPS), he examines how teachers and students negotiate power, knowledge, and epistemic agency. Second, he examines how beginning teachers learn from practice in and across their varied contexts. Third, he studies how teacher preparation programs can provide support and opportunities for beginning teachers to learn from practice. David has a background in biology and taught secondary life science for four years. David is the recipient of the AERA Exemplary Research Award for Division K (Teaching and Teacher Education), the Early Career Research Award from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, and "Research Worth Reading" from National Association for Research in Science Teaching and the National Science Teacher Association.
E. David Wong
Ph.D., Stanford University
dwong@msu.edu
David Wong is an associate professor of educational psychology and educational technology. He is especially interested in the potential for learning that comes when students from different cultures interact. He is the leader of several study abroad programs and conducts research related to students' experiences in those programs. His areas of interest also include: intercultural experience and learning, global education, science education and educational philosophy.
 
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