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MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

Faculty/Staff

Marilyn Amey is a professor of higher, adult, and lifelong education and chairperson of the Department of Educational Administration. She studies educational partnerships, particularly those of community colleges, leadership, including how leaders learn, post-secondary governance and administration, and faculty concerns, including interdisciplinary academic work. Her current work focuses on education partnerships including a multi-year evaluation of a multiple- institutional interdisciplinary consortium and factors affecting student transfer and degree attainment.
Laura Apol is an associate professor of literacy with a focus on children’s/young adult literature and creative writing (poetry). Apol has published scholarly articles on historical children’s literature, the intersection between children’s literature and literary theory, the pedagogy of children’s/YA literature and international children’s literature; she has also published articles on facilitating creative writing for children and for adults, and conducts creative writing workshops and classes for teachers and students on all levels. Her poetry has appeared in a number of literary journals and anthologies, and she is the author of several collections of her own poems: Falling into Grace, Crossing the Ladder of Sun (winner of the Oklahoma Book Award for Poetry), Celestial Bodies (winner of the Overleaf Chapbook Manuscript Competition) and Requiem, Rwanda, her newest full-length collection, drawn from her work using writing to facilitate healing among survivors of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi, and translated into Kinyarwanda under the title Emwe N’imvura Irabyibuka (Even the Rain Remembers).
Emily Bouck
Ph.D., Michigan State University
ecb@msu.edu
Emily Bouck’s research focuses on improving outcomes of secondary students with high- incidence disabilities through advances in two strands of scholarship: standard academic curricula (i.e., mathematics) and functional curricula. Within these strands is a focus on how technology can support students with disabilities in accessing and achieving in both curricula, and translating success to post-school experiences.
Douglas Campbell
Ph.D., Stanford University
campbell@msu.edu
Dorinda Carter Andrews is assistant dean of equity outreach initiatives for the College of Education and associate professor of race, culture and equity in the Department of Teacher Education. She is also a core faculty member in the African American and African Studies Program and co-director of the Graduate Urban Education Certificate Program. Her teaching and research focus on race and equity in education, urban teacher preparation and identity development, black student racial and achievement ideologies, and critical race praxis with in-service educators. She utilizes qualitative methodologies and critical theories to inform her work. Carter Andrews is co-editor of "Contesting the Myth of a Post-Racial Era: The Continued Significance of Race in U.S. Education" (2013) and is a 2014 recipient of the Early Career Contribution Award from the Committee on Scholars of Color in Education of the American Educational Research Association. She has given two TEDx talks, "The Consciousness Gap in Education" and "Teach Kids to be Eagles." Her work has been published in several academic journals, including Harvard Educational Review and Teachers College Record.
Janine Certo
Ph.D., Virginia Commonwealth University
certo@msu.edu
http://www.msu.edu/~certo
Janine is associate professor of language and literacy. Her scholarship bridges the fields of creative writing, middle childhood education and teacher education, with particular focus on sociocultural and sociolinguistic perspectives of learning to write poetry. Her recent work focuses on children's poetry writing practices, teachers' engagement with poetry, and poetic and interpretive research methodologies.
John Dirkx
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
dirkx@msu.edu
John M. Dirkx is professor and Mildred B. Erickson Distinguished Chair (Emeritus) in Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education at Michigan State University, and is Director of the College of Education Master's of Arts in Education (MAED) online program. His current research interests focus primarily on teaching and learning in higher and adult education contexts. Dirkx is particularly interested in short- term, faculty-led education abroad programs for graduate students; professional development for higher education teachers in developing countries; the role of higher education capacity building in international development; and the spiritual and transformative dimensions of adult, work-related learning. Dirkx is current editor of the Journal of Transformative Education, the primary author of A Guide to Planning and Implementing Instruction for Adults: A Theme-based Approach, and editor of Adult Learning and the Emotional Self. He has also published numerous book chapters and journal articles on teaching and learning in higher and adult education and work-related learning. He is currently working on a book on the transformative dimensions of teaching and learning.
Patricia Edwards is a professor of teacher education, the first African American president of the Literacy Research Association (formerly the National Reading Conference), and the 2010-2011 President of the International Reading Association. She has developed two nationally acclaimed family literacy programs: Parents as Partners in Reading and Talking Your Way to Literacy. Her research focuses on issues related to families and children: engaging hard to reach families, developing a scope and sequence of parent involvement, compiling different types of demographic family profiles, parent involvement and teacher thinking, parent involvement in the reading/writing process, parent support of children's oral preparation for literacy, portfolio instructional conversations with parents during regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences, and parents' stories of literacy and teachers' reactions to these stories. Her current research focuses on a broader question - how does the world read? During her graduate student days at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, she became curious about this question. Therefore, when she became the newly elected Vice-President of the International Reading Association (IRA) in May 2008, she immediately thought that she would return to this question of interest. In addition, I was motivated to ask this question because the International Reading Association has councils and affiliates in more than 100 countries and one of our popular slogans is "We teach the world to read."
Carol Sue Englert
Ph.D., Indiana University
carolsue@msu.edu
Carol Sue Englert is a professor of special education. Her research interests include literacy instruction for students at risk for school failure with a specific focus on the examination of discourse in literacy events. Her more recent work involves a collaborative research project with special education teachers to design, implement, and integrate a literacy curriculum emphasizing the role of oral and written language in a discourse community.
Matt Ferkany
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison
ferkany@msu.edu
http://www.msu.edu/~ferkany
Matt Ferkany is an Assistant Professor in the Teacher Education department. A philosopher by training, his research focuses on political, ethical, and pedagogical problems relating to environmental education, civic and moral education, and well-being and virtue. He is currently working on a project funded by the Spencer Foundation on the virtues in environmental education. But he has also published work on the sense of self-worth and the importance of fostering self-esteem relative to other aims of education.
Summer Ferreri
Ph.D., Ohio State University
sferreri@msu.edu
Summer Ferreri is an associate professor of special education. Her primary research focus is on the development, implementation and evaluation of effective interventions to increase academic success and decrease disruptive behaviors for students with severe disabilities. More specifically, her research utilizes the concepts and principles of Applied Behavior Analysis and single-subject research methods to investigate efficacious interventions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. She has conducted research with children with special needs to determine the most effective and least intrusive methods to decrease disruptive, self-injurious, self-stimulatory, pica, and aggressive behavior. She has conducted research on behavioral assessments of impulsivity in relation to dimensions of reinforcement, temporal discounting, reinforcement schedules, and conditioned and terminal reinforcers with children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).
Amelia Gotwals
Ph.D., University of Michigan
gotwals@msu.edu
Dr. Amelia Wenk Gotwals is an Associate Professor of Science Education in the Department of Teacher Education. As a former middle and high school science teacher, she has a particular interest in exploring the ways that students learn to engage in science practices with core ideas in science and the ways that curricular and assessment materials interact with teacher instruction to support this learning. She specifically focuses on researching the learning progressions students take as they develop more sophisticated understandings and ways of assessing this complex learning. She was the co-PI on an NSF grant, Deep Think, that developed and tested a learning progression and associated curricular and assessment materials that supported 3rd-5th grade students’ reasoning about issues in biodiversity. She was the PI on the NSF-funded project, Learning Progressions in Science (LeaPS), which organized the first national conference on learning progressions and she is the co-editor of the LeaPS book that emanated from this conference. She was also the PI of the Formative Assessment for Michigan Educators (FAME) project that explored how a statewide professional development program can support teachers in developing formative assessment practices.
Douglas K. Hartman
Ph.D., University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
dhartman@msu.edu
Douglas K. Hartman is a professor of technology, learning, and literacy with appointments in Teacher Education and Educational Psychology and Educational Technology. His research focuses on the use of technologies for human learning in a number of domains (e.g., school, community, work, sports).
Matthew Koehler
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison
mkoehler@msu.edu
http://www.matt-koehler.com/
Matthew Koehler is a professor of educational psychology and educational technology. His research focuses on understanding the affordances and constraints of new technologies; the design of technology-rich, innovative learning environments; and the professional development of teachers. His research examines how new technologies, such as video and hypermedia, may be well-suited to help learners (especially teachers) acquire new knowledge, skills, or understanding in complex and ill-structured domains. This has led to a program of research about a form of knowledge, Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK), that has developed theoretical, pedagogical, and methodological perspectives that characterize teachers who effectively integrate content, pedagogy, and technology in their classroom practice.
Troy Mariage
Ph.D., Michigan State University
mariaget@msu.edu
Troy Mariage is an associate professor of special education. His research interests are in the areas of literacy instruction for students with mild disabilities in elementary classrooms. He has conducted work in early reading instruction, writing instruction, and cognitive strategy instruction that leads to self-regulated learning. More recently, he has extended his work by seeking to understand how to create schools as learning organizations that create the capacity for continuous learning and improvement. Currently, he is conducting a study to explore how teachers can provide concurrent academic and social support for students with significant learning and behavioral difficulties.
Patricia Marin
Ph.D., University of Maryland
pmarin@msu.edu
Patricia Marin is an assistant professor of higher, adult, and lifelong education. Her research interests focus on higher education policy and issues of inclusion and equity for underrepresented students. In particular, her work examines issues of diversity, affirmative action and college access. In her current work, Marin is studying the changing nature of Hispanic Serving Institutions and research use within the law.
Evelyn Oka
Ph.D., University of Michigan
evoka@msu.edu
Evelyn Oka is an associate professor of school psychology, educational psychology and a Nationally certified School Psychologist. A developmental and school psychologist, she is interested in the development of self-regulation, social competence and motivation in school and home contexts, particularly among students with learning problems. Her research examines the use of a universal social-emotional intervention to enhance preschool children's self-regulation and social skills in an inclusion classroom. She is also interested in the cultural validity and transportability of evidence-based interventions with diverse populations.
Cynthia Okolo is a professor of special education. Her research focuses on improving academic outcomes for students with disabilities through the integration of technology into the classroom. She also studies how Universal Design for Learning (UDL)-aligned instructional practices can improve learning and behavior. Her current projects involve the development of literacy tools and strategies for using digital reading materials and teacher preparation for the implementation of UDL. Most of her work has been conducted in middle and high schools and in diverse classrooms that include students with and without disabilities. She is Past President and Professional Development Co-Chair of the Technology and Media Division of the Council for Exceptional Children.
Django Paris
Ph.D., Stanford University
dparis@msu.edu
Django Paris is an associate professor of language and literacy in the Department of Teacher Education. Paris is also core faculty in the African American and African Studies Program and affiliated faculty in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures. His teaching and research focus on understanding and sustaining languages, literacies, and lifeways among youth and communities of color in the context of demographic and social change. He is particularly concerned with educational and cultural justice as outcomes of inquiry and pedagogy. Paris is author of Language across Difference: Ethnicity, Communication, and Youth Identities in Changing Urban Schools (2011), and co-editor of both Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry with Youth and Communities (2014) and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies: Teaching and Learning for Justice in a Changing World (2017). He has published in many academic journals, including the Harvard Educational Review and Educational Researcher.
Ralph Putnam
Ph.D., Stanford University
ralphp@msu.edu
Ralph Putnam is an associate professor of educational psychology whose research focuses on the cognitively oriented study of classroom teaching and learning and role of technology in learning. His recent research has examined the teaching and learning of mathematics in elementary school classrooms, especially the knowledge and beliefs of teachers as they teach mathematics for understanding and the different ways that students learn about mathematics from various kinds of instruction.
Cary Roseth
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
croseth@msu.edu
Cary Roseth is an associate professor of educational psychology. He is interested in social development, peer relations, and social contextual influences on classroom achievement. His research focuses on the development of conflict resolution in early childhood and on the effects of cooperation, competition, and individualistic goal structures on children’s academic achievement and peer relations.
Niral Shah
Ph.D., University of California-Berkeley
niral@msu.edu
Niral Shah’s research focuses on equity and implicit bias in STEM education. Although mathematics is often seen as “neutral” and “race-free,” Shah’s research shows that math classrooms are highly racialized spaces. Through classroom observations and student interviews, he studies how racial narratives (e.g., “Asians are good at math”) affect classroom interaction and serve to position students as more or less capable of learning math. Shah also studies how perceptions of status affect student learning in elementary computer science. Currently, he is developing a web-based classroom observation tool to help STEM teachers reflect upon implicit bias and improve their practice toward the goal of more equitable opportunities to learn.
Riyad Shahjahan
Ph.D., University of Toronto
shahja95@msu.edu
Riyad A. Shahjahan is a faculty member in higher, adult and lifelong education. His areas of expertise are in globalization and higher education, teaching and learning in higher education (focusing on anti-oppressive and embodied pedagogy), equity and social justice and anti/postcolonial theory. He has been conducting both empirical and theoretical work, focusing on: a) the role of international organizations (IOs) in globalizing higher education policy through empirical/theoretical analyses of IOs’ current policy initiatives (e.g., the OECD, World Bank, UNESCO, etc.), and b) rethinking the traditional objects of study/practice in higher education from global and non-western critical perspectives, particularly using anti/postcolonial theoretical perspectives.
Steven Weiland
Ph.D., University of Chicago
weiland@msu.edu

Steven Weiland is a professor in the graduate program in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education (in the College of Education). He has degrees from Brooklyn College of the City University of New York (B.A. in English) and the University of Chicago (PhD in English).

Previous to his appointment at Michigan State, he held faculty and administrative positions at the University of Michigan, the University of Cincinnati, the University of Iowa and the University of Minnesota. For much of his career, Professor Weiland taught in departments of English and American Studies. At the University of Minnesota, where he taught courses in literature and the history of psychology (at the Institute for Child Development), he was director of the Department of Professional Development Programs. He also spent nine years as executive director of the National Federation of State Humanities Councils, a non-profit organization serving the state programs of the National Endowment for the Humanities. After moving to MSU, Professor Weiland also spent eight years as director of the University’s Jewish Studies Program in the College of Arts and Letters.

Professor Weiland’s primary interests are in the intersections of the humanities and the social and behavioral sciences in the subjects of adult and career development, technology and higher education, biography and other forms of narrative inquiry, and in research methods, rhetoric and writing. He teaches courses in career development (EAD 864) and education in the digital age (EAD 878) among other subjects and the college-wide course in research (CEP 930). In all, Professor Weiland teaches five online courses in two College of Education MA programs, all in a self-paced hypermedia format he has devised. In spring 2015, Professor Weiland will offer a new hybrid course for PhD students in “Scholarly and Scientific Communications in the Digital Age.”

Professor Weiland is the author of Intellectual Craftsmen: Ways and Works in American Scholarship and of many essays on subjects in the humanities and education, and he is the co-author of Keywords of Social Gerontology and co-editor of Jazz in Mind. He is at work on Faculty Work in the Digital Age: A Primer and The Scholar's Tale: Life Stories and Intellectual Identities.

Tanya Wright
Ph.D., University of Michigan
tswright@msu.edu
Tanya Wright is a former kindergarten teacher whose research and teaching focus on curriculum and instruction in language and literacy during the early childhood and elementary years. Her research examines instructional practices that promote oral language, vocabulary, and knowledge development for young children. Wright is co- author of several books for teachers and parents including, "All About Words: Increasing Vocabulary in the Common Core Classroom PreK-2." Her work has been published in journals such as American Educator, The Elementary School Journal, The Reading Teacher, Reading and Writing, and Reading Research Quarterly.

Active Grants:

  • National Science Foundation
    Developing A Discourse Observation Tool and Online Professional Development to Promote Science, Oral Language and Literacy Development from the Start of School (SOLID Start)
Aman Yadav
Ph.D., Michigan State University
ayadav@msu.edu
Aman Yadav’s research focuses on preparing teachers to embed computational thinking practices and computing in the classroom. He is working to establish an evidence-based professional development program, including continuous online support, to improve teachers’ knowledge to teach computing concepts at the high school level. In addition, his research focuses on developing an understanding of problem-based learning (PBL) and case-based instruction (CBI) in STEM disciplines, with a specific focus on engineering education.