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Faculty Support

Grant Information for Faculty

Click link for useful grant information for faculty members.

Foundation Opportunities:

Other Funding Opportunities:

Institute of Education Sciences (IES)

National Institutes of Health (NIH)

National Science Foundation (NSF)

SciVal Database

Selected External Grant Announcement

Spencer Foundation Small Research Grants

2017 Deadlines: May 1, August 1, and November 1

The Small Research Grants program is intended to support education research projects with budgets of $50,000 or less. In keeping with the Spencer Foundation’s mission, this program aims to fund academic work that will contribute to the improvement of education, broadly conceived. 
Historically, the work we have funded through these grants has spanned, a range of topics and disciplines, including education, psychology, sociology, economics, history, and anthropology, and they employ a wide range of research methods. The following examples of recently funded small grants illustrate the diversity of what we support:

  • an experimental study of how college students use visual representations in solving math problems
  • a study exploring the process of racial and rural identity formation among African American high-school students who attend de facto segregated schools in the rural South
  • a mixed-methods study focusing on the different types of knowledge novice and experienced teachers draw on in teaching for reading comprehension

The majority of small grant proposals that are funded by the Foundation are “field-initiated” in the sense that they are not submitted in response to a Request for Proposal (RFP).

William T. Grant Foundation Research Grants

LOI deadlines: May 3, 2017, and August 2, 2017

We support high-quality research that is relevant to policies and practices that affect the lives of young people ages 5 to 25 in the United States.

We fund research that increases our understanding of programs, policies, and practices that reduce inequality in youth outcomes, and research that identifies, builds, and tests strategies to improve the use of research evidence in ways that benefit youth. The application process for all research grants begins with a letter of inquiry. Letters of inquiry are generally received three times a year, in January, May, and August.

Research grants on reducing inequality typically range from $100,000 to $600,000 and cover two to three years of support. Improving the use of research evidence grants will range from $100,000 to $1,000,000 and cover two to four years of support. Officers’ Research grants for both initiatives cover budgets up to $25,000. To learn more about our research grants, eligibility requirements, and application process, please see the materials and links listed below.

NSF – Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (INCLUDES)

Deadline: May 16, 2017
Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations focused on NSF's commitment to diversity, inclusion, and broadening participation in these fields. NSF INCLUDES supports efforts to create networked relationships among organizations whose goals include developing talent from all sectors of society to build the STEM workforce. This initiative seeks to improve collaborative efforts aimed at enhancing the preparation, increasing the participation, and ensuring the contributions of individuals from groups that have traditionally been underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise: women, persons with disabilities, African Americans/Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, Native Pacific Islanders, and persons from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Significant advancement in the inclusion of these groups will result in a new generation of STEM talent and leadership to secure our nation’s future and long-term economic competitiveness.
The grand challenge of broadening participation in STEM is to transform the STEM enterprise at all levels in order to fully engage the nation’s talent for the ultimate improvement of the STEM enterprise. As a comprehensive national initiative, NSF INCLUDES aims to address the various complex equity and inclusion-related challenges and opportunities that characterize the nation’s cultural and linguistic diversity, with a specific emphasis on the aforementioned groups. The goal is to achieve impact at the national level. Viewing inclusion as an asset and opportunity for social innovation, NSF is particularly interested in using approaches to scaling and growth, such as collective impact, networked improvement communities, and strategic partnerships. The objective is to develop networks that involve representative organizations and consortia from different sectors that are committed to a common agenda that comprehensively solves a specific STEM-inclusion problem. The long-term goal of NSF INCLUDES is to support innovative models, networks, partnerships, technical capabilities and research that will enable the U.S. science and engineering workforce to thrive by ensuring that traditionally underrepresented and underserved groups are represented in percentages comparable to their representation in the U.S. population. Researchers and practitioners at minority serving institutions are strongly encouraged to participate in this activity given their experience and expertise in broadening participation.

 

Spencer Foundation Conference Grants

Deadline: May 18, 2017
The Spencer Foundation’s Conference Grant program is designed to provide support to scholars for small research conferences and focused symposia. The conference grant program intends to bring together researchers whose substantive knowledge, theoretical insight, and methodological expertise can be assembled in ways that build upon and advance best practices in education research. Through this grant program, the Foundation rotates the area of focus periodically to generate fresh ideas and perspectives on pressing educational challenges.
In spite of the presence of large and small educational research meetings, scholars continue to seek resources for exploring and discussing new lines of inquiry that do not fit into the agendas of existing conferences. The meetings we aim to support can include a broad set of perspectives on topics or problems connected to a specific area of focus. This grant program invites the scholarly community to share its best ideas for engaging in dialogue about education research to catalyze innovation, advance the field, and enhance our ability to understand key issues. To be competitive, conference proposals should have a detailed agenda that is related to advancing research on the current focus area, which changes periodically.

 

NSF – Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

Deadline: May 26, 2017
The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. REU projects involve students in meaningful ways in ongoing research programs or in research projects specifically designed for the REU program. This solicitation features two mechanisms for support of student research: (1) REU Sites are based on independent proposals to initiate and conduct projects that engage a number of students in research. REU Sites may be based in a single discipline or academic department or may offer interdisciplinary or multi-department research opportunities with a coherent intellectual theme. Proposals with an international dimension are welcome. (2) REU Supplements may be included as a component of proposals for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements or may be requested for ongoing NSF-funded research projects.
Undergraduate student participants in either REU Sites or REU Supplements must be U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or permanent residents of the United States.
Students do not apply to NSF to participate in REU activities. Students apply directly to REU Sites or to NSF-funded investigators who receive REU Supplements. To identify appropriate REU Sites, students should consult the directory of active REU Sites on the Web at http://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/reu_search.cfm.

 

Russell Sage Foundation – Social Inequality/Future of Work/Race, Ethnicity & Immigration/Behavioral Economics

Letter of Inquiry Deadline: May 31, 2017
See website for details of all funding opportunities.
This is from the Social Inequality Program:
The Russell Sage Foundation's program on Social Inequality supports innovative research on whether rising economic inequality has affected social, political, and economic institutions, and the extent to which increased inequality has affected equality of opportunity, social mobility, and the intergenerational transmission of advantage. We seek investigator-initiated research projects that will broaden our understanding of the causes and consequences of rising economic inequalities in the United States.

Spencer Foundation Research-Practice Partnerships

Deadline: June 1, 2017
For many years, the Spencer Foundation has awarded research grants to support the work of Research-Practice Partnerships (RPPs). The Foundation now has a formal grant program specifically designed to support a range of activities in several different types of these organizations.
The Spencer Foundation believes that RPP models can complement traditional basic education research. Arguably, RPPs have created a new model for conducting education research, moving away from researcher-driven studies of uncertain relevance to practitioners and policy makers and toward research that is more specifically designed to guide improvement efforts. We also believe that the RPP model can facilitate the long-term accumulation of knowledge in new ways as researchers and practitioners delve into specific topics in a specific setting over time. The nature of RPPs enables this long-term focus, which is more difficult to sustain in traditional research settings, often due to the constraints of funding timelines. Over the long term, we anticipate that research conducted by RPPs will result in improved outcomes for students, teachers, schools, and communities.

 

NSF – Perception, Action & Cognition

Deadline: June 15, 2017 and August 1, 2017
The PAC program funds theoretically motivated research on a wide-range of topic areas focused on typical human behavior. The aim is to enhance the fundamental understanding of perceptual, motor, and cognitive processes and their interactions. Central research topics for consideration by the program include (but are not limited to) vision, audition, haptics, attention, memory, reasoning, written and spoken language, motor control, categorization, and spatial cognition. Of particular interest are emerging areas, such as the interaction of sleep or emotion with cognitive or perceptual processes and the epigenetics of cognition. The program welcomes a wide range of perspectives, such as individual differences, symbolic computation, connectionism, ecological, genetics and epigenetics, nonlinear dynamics and complex systems, and a variety of methodologies including both experimental studies and modeling. The PAC program is open to co-review of proposals submitted to other programs both within the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate and across other directorates.

 

NSF – Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program (IUCRC)

Deadlines:
Full Proposal Target Dates:
February 28, 2017
June 21, 2017
December 20, 2017
Preliminary Proposal Deadline Dates:
April 19, 2017
October 18, 2017

The Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers (IUCRC) program develops long-term partnerships among industry, academe, and government. The Centers are catalyzed by an investment from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and are primarily supported by industry Center members, with NSF taking a supporting role in the development and evolution of the Center. Each Center is established to conduct research that is of interest to both the industry members and the Center faculty. An IUCRC contributes to the nation's research infrastructure base and enhances the intellectual capacity of the engineering and science workforce through the integration of research and education. As appropriate, an IUCRC uses international collaborations to advance these goals within the global context.

 

William T. Grant Foundation Scholars

Deadline: July 6, 2017
This career development program supports promising early-career researchers with interests in reducing inequality or understanding the use of research evidence.
The William T. Grant Scholars Program supports career development for promising early-career researchers. The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand junior researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas. We recognize that early-career researchers are rarely given incentives or support to take such risks, so this award includes a mentoring component, as well as an emphasis on community and collaboration.
Scholars Program applicants should have a track record of conducting high-quality research and an interest in pursuing a significant shift in their trajectories as researchers. Proposed research plans must address questions of policy and practice that are relevant to the Foundation’s focus areas.

 

NSF – Science of Learning (SL)

Deadlines: July 12, 2017 and January 18, 2018
The Science of Learning program supports potentially transformative basic research to advance the science of learning. The goals of the SL Program are to develop basic theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge about learning principles, processes and constraints. Projects that are integrative and/or interdisciplinary may be especially valuable in moving basic understanding of learning forward but research with a single discipline or methodology is also appropriate if it addresses basic scientific questions in learning. The possibility of developing connections between proposed research and specific scientific, technological, educational, and workforce challenges will be considered as valuable broader impacts, but are not necessarily central to the intellectual merit of proposed research. The program will support research addressing learning in a wide range of domains at one or more levels of analysis including: molecular/cellular mechanisms; brain systems; cognitive affective, and behavioral processes; and social/cultural influences. The program supports a variety of methods including: experiments, field studies, surveys, secondary-data analyses, and modeling.

NSF - Developmental Sciences (DS)

Deadline: July 17, 2017

DS supports basic research that increases our understanding of cognitive, linguistic, social, cultural, and biological processes related to human development across the lifespan. Research supported by this program will add to our knowledge of the underlying developmental processes that support social, cognitive, and behavioral functioning, thereby illuminating ways for individuals to live productive lives as members of society.

DS supports research that addresses developmental processes within the domains of cognitive, social, emotional, and motor development across the lifespan by working with any appropriate populations for the topics of interest including infants, children, adolescents, adults, and non-human animals. The program also supports research investigating factors that affect developmental change including family, peers, school, community, culture, media, physical, genetic, and epigenetic influences. Additional priorities include research that: incorporates multidisciplinary, multi-method, microgenetic, and longitudinal approaches; develops new methods, models, and theories for studying development; includes participants from a range of ethnicities, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures; and integrates different processes (e.g., memory, emotion, perception, cognition), levels of analysis (e.g., behavioral, social, neural), and time scales. 

The budgets and durations of supported projects vary widely and are greatly influenced by the nature of the project. Investigators should focus on innovative, potentially transformative research plans and then develop a budget to support those activities, rather than starting with a budget number and working up to that value.

While there are no specific rules about budget limitations, a typical project funded through the DS program is approximately 3 years in duration with a total cost budget, including both direct and indirect costs, between $100,000 and $200,000 per year. Interested applicants are urged to explore the NSF awards database for the DS program to review examples of awards that have been made.

The DS program also accepts proposals for workshops and small conferences. These typically have total cost budgets, including direct and indirect costs, of approximately $35,000.

NSF – Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER)

Deadline: July 19, 2017
CAREER: The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity that offers the National Science Foundation's most prestigious awards in support of early-career faculty who have the potential to serve as academic role models in research and education and to lead advances in the mission of their department or organization. Activities pursued by early-career faculty should build a firm foundation for a lifetime of leadership in integrating education and research. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from early-career faculty at all CAREER-eligible organizations and especially encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply.

 

NSF – Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

Deadline: August 3, 2017
The Science, Technology, and Society (STS) program supports research that uses historical, philosophical, and social scientific methods to investigate the intellectual, material, and social facets of the scientific, technological, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines. It encompasses a broad spectrum of STS topics including interdisciplinary studies of ethics, equity, governance, and policy issues that are closely related to STEM disciplines, including medical science.
The program’s review process is approximately six months. It includes appraisal of proposals by ad hoc reviewers selected for their expertise and by an advisory panel that meets twice a year. The deadlines for the submission of proposals are February 2nd for proposals to be funded as early as July, and August 3rd for proposals to be funded in or after January. There is one exception: Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant proposals will have only one deadline per year, August 3rd.
The Program encourages potential investigators with questions as to whether their proposal fits the goals of the program to contact one of the program officers.

NSF – ADVANCE: Increasing the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

Letter of Intent Deadline: August 9, 2017
Despite significant increases in the proportion of women pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) doctoral degrees, women are significantly underrepresented as faculty, particularly in upper ranks, and in academic administrative positions, in almost all STEM fields. The problems of recruitment, retention, and advancement that are the causes of this underrepresentation vary by discipline and across groups of women faculty (e.g., by race/ethnicity, disability status, sexual orientation, foreign-born and foreign-trained status, and faculty appointment type). The ADVANCE program is designed to foster gender equity through a focus on the identification and elimination of organizational barriers that impede the full participation and advancement of all women faculty in academic institutions. Organizational barriers that inhibit equity may exist in areas such as policy, practice, culture, and organizational climate. For example, practices in academic departments that result in the inequitable allocation of service or teaching assignments may impede research productivity, delay advancement and create a culture of differential treatment and rewards. Policies and procedures that do not mitigate implicit bias in hiring, tenure, and promotion decisions could mean that women and underrepresented minorities are evaluated less favorably, perpetuating their underrepresentation and contributing to a climate that is not inclusive.
The goals of the ADVANCE program are (1) to develop systemic approaches to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic STEM careers; (2) to develop innovative and sustainable ways to promote gender equity that involve both men and women in the STEM academic workforce; and (3) to contribute to the research knowledge base on gender equity and the intersection of gender and other identities in STEM academic careers. The ADVANCE program contributes to the development of a more diverse science and engineering workforce because of the focus on equity for STEM academic faculty who are educating, training, and mentoring undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scholars.

NSF – Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST)

Deadline: August 9, 2017
ITEST is a program that promotes PreK-12 student interests and capacities to participate in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and information and communications technology (ICT) workforce of the future. To achieve this objective, ITEST supports the development, implementation, and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in experiences that: (1) increase student awareness of STEM and ICT careers; (2) motivate students to pursue the education necessary to participate in those careers; and/or (3) provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop their knowledge of related content and skills (including critical thinking skills) needed for entering the STEM workforce. ITEST projects may adopt an interdisciplinary focus on multiple STEM domains, focus on a single domain, or focus on one or more sub-disciplines within a domain. ITEST projects must involve students, and may also include teachers. The ITEST program is especially interested in broadening participation of students from traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields and related education and workforce domains. Projects that actively engage business and industry partners to better ensure that PreK-12 experiences foster the knowledge and skill-sets needed for emerging STEM-related occupations are strongly encouraged. ITEST supports two project types: Strategies projects and SPrEaD (Successful Project Expansion and Dissemination) projects. Strategies projects support the design, implementation, and testing of innovative educational experiences that support the objectives of the ITEST program. SPrEaD projects support the wider and broader testing and dissemination of promising strategies to generate evidence and greater understanding of contextual factors that operate to enhance, moderate, or constrain anticipated project impacts. All ITEST projects may include activities designed to inform judgments regarding the feasibility of implementing strategies in typical learning environments associated with formal classrooms, out-of-school settings, or combinations of such environments. The ITEST program also invites proposals for an ITEST Resource Center to provide technical assistance to projects and provide assistance with the outreach activities of the ITEST program.

NSF – Decision, Risk, and Management Sciences (DRMS)

Deadline: August 18, 2017
The Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, doctoral dissertation research improvement grants (DDRIGs), and workshops are funded in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; management science and organizational design. The program also supports small grants that are time-critical (Rapid Response Research - RAPID) and small grants that are high-risk and of a potentially transformative nature (EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research - EAGER).

 

NSF – Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program

Deadline: August 29, 2017
The National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program seeks to encourage talented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science (including engineering and computer science) teachers. The program invites creative and innovative proposals that address the critical need for recruiting and preparing highly effective elementary and secondary science and mathematics teachers in high-need local educational agencies. The program offers four tracks: Track 1: The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarships and Stipends Track, Track 2: The NSF Teaching Fellowships Track, Track 3: The NSF Master Teaching Fellowships Track, and Track 4: Noyce Research Track. In addition, Capacity Building proposals are accepted from proposers intending to develop a future Track 1, 2, or 3 proposal.

 

NSF – Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (MMS)

Deadline: August 31, 2017
The Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (MMS) Program is an interdisciplinary program in the Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences that supports the development of innovative, analytical, and statistical methods and models for those sciences. MMS seeks proposals that are methodologically innovative, grounded in theory, and have potential utility for multiple fields within the social and behavioral sciences. As part of its larger portfolio, the MMS Program partners with a consortium of federal statistical agencies to support research proposals that further the development of new and innovative approaches to surveys and to the analysis of survey data.
The MMS Program provides support through a number of different funding mechanisms. The following mechanisms are addressed in this solicitation:
Regular Research Awards
Awards for conferences, workshops, and community-development activities
Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement (DDRI) Grants
Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Supplements
MMS also supports Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) awards.

 

William T. Grant Foundation Institutional Challenge Grant

Deadline: September 12, 2017
The Institutional Challenge Grant encourages research institutions to build sustained research-practice partnerships with public agencies or nonprofit organizations in order to reduce inequality in youth outcomes. Applications are welcome from partnerships in youth-serving areas such as education, justice, child welfare, mental health, immigration, and workforce development.
The Institutional Challenge Grant encourages research institutions to build sustained research-practice partnerships with public agencies or nonprofit organizations in order to reduce inequality in youth outcomes.
To do so, research institutions will need to build the capacity of researchers to produce relevant work and the capacity of agency and nonprofit partners to use research. Equally important, research institutions will need to shift their policies and practices to value collaborative research.
Applications are welcome from partnerships in youth-serving areas such as education, justice, child welfare, mental health, immigration, and workforce development.

NSF – EHR Core Research (ECR)

Deadline: September 14, 2017
The EHR Core Research (ECR) program of fundamental research in STEM education provides funding in critical research areas that are essential, broad and enduring. EHR seeks proposals that will help synthesize, build and/or expand research foundations in the following focal areas: STEM learning, STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and broadening participation in STEM.
The ECR program is distinguished by its emphasis on the accumulation of robust evidence to inform efforts to (a) understand, (b) build theory to explain, and (c) suggest interventions (and innovations) to address persistent challenges in STEM interest, education, learning, and participation. The program supports advances in fundamental research on STEM learning and education by fostering efforts to develop foundational knowledge in STEM learning and learning contexts, both formal and informal, from childhood through adulthood, for all groups, and from the earliest developmental stages of life through participation in the workforce, resulting in increased public understanding of science and engineering. The ECR program will fund fundamental research on: human learning in STEM; learning in STEM learning environments, STEM workforce development, and research on broadening participation in STEM.


Jackson National Community Fund

Internal Deadline: April 20th each year

Charitable organizations in the Lansing, Denver, Nashville or Chicago areas that are interested in applying for a grant or sponsorship through the Jackson National Community Fund (JNCF) are encouraged to submit this application for consideration. Jackson National Life Insurance Company (Jackson)® directs the majority of its funding to nonprofits that benefit children or seniors in those communities in which the company operates.
MSU has a single point of contact for all philanthropic requests to the Jackson National Community Fund. If you are interested in requesting funding, do not contact Jackson National, contact Larry Wallach at wallach@uadv.msu.edu.
From Larry:
1. All MSU units or programs that want to apply for JNL support during our next fiscal year that begins on July 1st will provide me with a brief description of their potential request, along with the amount, by April 20th of each year.
2. I will put these potential requests into a single menu for Danielle/JNL’s review, which I will provide to her by May 1st.
3. Upon review, Danielle /JNL will let us know in mid-May which potential requests JNL will invite a full proposals for.
4. Those invited to submit a full proposal will then apply online during Cycle C, before JNL’s June application deadline, which falls on June 22nd this year. See attached link: https://www.jackson.com/our-company/in-the-community/jncf-grant-application.xhtml (Note: Danielle has asked that, from now on, ALL MSU requests for which a proposal has been invited apply during the Cycle C period only and not during JNL’s other grant cycles.)

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation

Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. believed effective change should make an impact from the start, yet carry long into the future. To do both, he earmarked a portion of his estate and the eventual sale of his beloved Buffalo Bills to fund his namesake foundation. The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation began operations in 2015 to continue his legacy—one of generosity and innovation, healthy risk taking and collaboration, and an unshakeable community focus.

The Foundation’s geographic focus is Southeast Michigan & Western NY State.  The Foundation defines SE Michigan as:  Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Monroe, Washtenaw, St. Clair and Livingston Counties.  The Foundation’s policies state that “Programs located outside of these regions are generally not encouraged.”  What this means, as a practical matter, is that any successful MSU requests will need to be based on activity and relationships within the counties listed.

Wilson Foundation Program areas:

  • Children and Youth: For kids, we’re looking for opportunities beyond K-12 education to provide more pathways to success. Here, we focus on strengthening young minds and bodies with early childhood initiatives, sports and youth development programs, and after school programs.
  •  Young Adults and Working Class Families: Often weighed down by heavy demands and limited resources, working class families and young adults can often miss out on career opportunities. We will invest in skills training and education that can lead to pathways to good paying jobs and increased independence.
  • Caregiving: The role of caregiver can be demanding and overwhelming. Here, we support and honor those who care for others – whether paid or voluntarily – through efforts that provide needed skills, resources, education and respite. Early opportunities will focus primarily on those caring for older adults and seniors.
  • Health Communities: A thriving community starts with the well-being of its people. Here, we will seek opportunities to support: community design and access to space, and programs that support healthy living; improving non-profit productivity and innovation; and economic development levers that spur regional growth, innovation and equity.

There is no deadline, applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The foundation has indicated that all MSU inquiries and applications should route to Lawrence Wallach, Associate Director of MSU Corporate & Foundation Relations.

 

Internal Grant Announcements

Internal Grant Programs in the Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies (VPRGS)

The Office of the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies (VPRGS) maintains a list of up-to-date internal grant funding opportunities at Michigan State University.

Internal Funding administered by the Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI)

More information on internal funding from the Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI).

International Studies and Programs Center for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies - MSU in Turkey

Michigan State University faculty and alumni in Turkey are active and supportive of several formal linkages with educational institutions, Turkish and Turkic language course offerings, study abroad programs and international research initiatives in Turkey.

MSU Technologies – The Targeted Support Grant for Technology Development (TSGTD)

Awards funded by VPRGS on a continuous basis.

The OVPRGS has allocated new funding in FY 2016-2017 to support Targeted Support Grants for Technology Development (TSGTD). TSGTD awards are intended to accelerate the commercial development of inventions, technologies and copyright materials within the entire MSU intellectual property estate. Support is targeted to address narrow, specific technology “gaps”, to better establish proof of concept, and to enable key, go-no go decisions concerning the potential for commercial application. As such, these awards may enhance or create business opportunities including licensing, marketing, new company creation or other business development efforts within the MSU Innovation Center (http://innovation.msu.edu).

Proposals are submitted by MSU Technology Tech Managers in collaboration with faculty inventors. Eligibility for TSGTD funding requires:

  • evidence of secure IP (submitted or issued technology patents)
  • completion of formal technology screening or full commercial assessment evidencing commercial potential, if not specific market options. This process is initiated routinely upon submission of an invention disclosure.

TSGTD applications are accepted and immediately reviewed at any time throughout the year. Nominations are jointly prepared by inventors and MSUT Tech Managers and submitted to a Research Review Committee convened by the OVPRGS to facilitate confidential peer review by selected internal (MSU) or external expert panels. This approach allows immediate evaluations and funding decisions on a continuous basis. This offers the advantage of avoiding extended time delays inherent in other internal or external grant programs. The TSGTD review process ensures confidentiality to both applicants and expert referees and protects against disclosure of IP.

Award categories range from flexible, short term projects conducted within MSUT (Category A – $5,000 -$10,000), to more complex short or long term research projects involving MSU inventors (Category B/C – $10,000 - $100,000), as well as projects involving co-investments ($ or in-kind) by commercial partners (Category D – $75-150,000). Projects within Category D have high priority based on the commitment of commercial customers willing to share risks of development.

IRTL Seed Grants

The College of Education’s Institute for Research on Teaching and Learning has funds to support either projects that are likely to lead to larger funded projects or small research projects. The goal of the “seed” grants is to enable COE faculty to develop research grant proposals and to increase their likelihood of successfully competing for research funds. However, research projects that stand alone will also be supported.