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Fellows

 

Admitted 2009

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; brummetq@msu.edu

Quentin Brummet is a fifth year graduate student in the Department of Economics. He received a B.A. in Mathematics and Economics from Illinois Wesleyan University and a M.A. in Economics from Michigan State University. In addition to Economics of Education, his areas of specialization are Labor Economics, Public Economics, and Applied Econometrics. Specifically, his research investigates topics such as school closing policies, teacher labor markets, inter-district choice, and four day school weeks.

judy

 

Education Policy, College of Education; judyjust@msu.edu

During my undergraduate experience at the University of Missouri studying political science and economics, I began to focus specifically on education policy. I had the opportunity to intern with the state legislature and research education finance. I also studied comparative education policies within red and blue states and completed a senior research project in special education policy. I left the books behind to get a ground level perspective on education with the Teach for America program. I taught kindergarten and first grade in Houston, Texas, and was named my school's Teacher of the Year in 2009. I have the opportunity, here at Michigan State, to combine my passion and experience to contribute to the field of education policy. As a fellow of the Economics of Education Program, I would like to research teacher labor market issues such as mobility and retention of teachers in high-need districts, effectiveness and impacts of teacher incentive-pay programs, and how accountability policies affect teacher motivation and success.

Maxfield

 

Department of Economics; maxfiel7@msu.edu

Michelle Maxfield is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics with concentrations in Public Economics, Applied Econometrics, the Economics of Education, and Labor Economics. Her current research examines the effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit throughout all ages of childhood on achievement and future educational attainment. As a fellow, she has worked as a research assistant for the past three years on a project evaluating the validity of teacher value-added measures.

 

obenauf

 

Education Policy, College of Education; torphyka@msu.edu

While earning B.A. degrees in both Psychology and Economics at Michigan State University, I received awards for my paper discussing women and the gender gap in math and science. To give back to my community, I taught second and third grade on Chicago's South side for Teach for America. I assumed leadership roles in Chicago and secured grant funding for additional resources. Connecting learning to real world circumstances by instituting a classroom mini-economy, I helped raise my students' reading and math achievement scores dramatically. I was granted two Segal Americorp Education Awards for national and community service in teaching. As a Dean's Scholar in Educational Policy and a recipient of the new IES award in the economics of education at MSU, I am honored to belong to a community of scholars and hope to further my research on alternative certification, teacher preparation, and teacher culture and its affect on one's job satisfaction.

quin

 

Department of Economics; quineliz@msu.edu

I am a fourth year economics graduate student at Michigan State University working in applied microeconomics, public economics, and economics of education (Ph.D. expected 2012). My research includes an investigation of the early grade effectiveness of private versus public schools in India with Chudgar (paper submitted), an analysis of financial support of postsecondary students with Haider, and a new study of transfers between 2-year and 4-year post-secondary institutions.

stacy

 

Department of Economics; stacybri@msu.edu

I received my B.S. from the University of South Carolina in 2009. I focused on economics and mathematics, and it was my interest in these two subjects that drove me to my present status as a PhD student in economics. I chose to specialize in the economics of education because of education's important social role and because of the field's abundance of unanswered questions. I wish to have a career that is filled with solving important and interesting problems, and I am confident that studying the economics of education will give me just that.

Thompson

 

Department of Economics; thomp944@msu.edu

Paul Thompson is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics. His research interests include Public Economics, Economics of Education, Public Policy, and Applied Microeconometrics.  His current research focuses on state policies that target fiscally troubled school districts and local governments.  For more information please visit: https://sites.google.com/site/pnthompson09/.

 

 

Admitted 2010

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; batesmi3@msu.edu

Michael Bates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics. He came into the program after having spent the previous four years teaching middle school, initially with Teach for America. His research interests include the Economics of Education, Labor Economics, Public Economics, and Industrial Organization. His current work focuses on informational asymmetries and their impact on teacher mobility and the distribution of teacher quality. For more information please visit: https://sites.google.com/site/batesmichaeld/home.

 

 

Burkander

 

Department of Economics; burkande@msu.edu

Paul Burkander graduated summa cum laude from Eastern Michigan University with a BS in Mathematics and Honors Economics. While there, he was awarded the Gockerman Award for outstanding paper in Economics, for his explicative of Thorstein Veblen's "Why is Economics not an Evolutionary Science?" This paper was published in Thorstein Veblen: Economics for an Age of Crises.

Paul was accepted as a fellow in MSU's Economics of Education program in 2010, the second year of his PhD Program in Economics. His interests include the evolution of educational institutions, and productivity of and preferences for allocations of educational resources.

 

brummet

 

Education Policy, College of Education; chandr44@msu.edu

I am a second-year Ph.D. student in the education policy program at Michigan State University. Prior to joining the education policy program, I earned the Donald Stone award for academic excellence in Public Administration from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA) at the University of Pittsburgh. As an intern at the Municipality of Mt. Lebanon, PA, I conducted original survey research on performance measurement and helped to initiate a system of performance measurement tailored to their needs. This past year, I have had the opportunity to work at the Michigan Department of Education's Office of Educational Improvement and Innovation.

My research interests include teacher quality, equity, and comparative international education. As a recipient of the summer research development fellowship (SRDF) 2010, awarded by the College of Education, I researched the issue of contract teaching in India and its implications for teacher motivation and teacher quality.

I am generously supported by the IES grant for the Economics of Education fellowship within the College of Education.

brummet

 

Department of Economics; cookwalt@msu.edu

I completed my B.A. in Political Science at UC Davis in 2005 and my M.A. in Economics at CSU Sacramento in 2010. I am very excited and grateful to be pursuing my PhD in Economics at Michigan State, with a specialization in the Economics of Education. My research interests lie at the intersection between Economics and Political Science in order to identify public policies that maximize both efficiency and equity for society. For example, my Master's thesis examined the role that changing demographics of undergraduates impact state appropriations for public universities.

Harris

 

Education Policy, College of Education; harri974@msu.edu

I started my academic career at the University of North Texas. I graduated with high honors in May of 2005, earning a Bachelor of Arts in Economics. Upon graduation, I was recognized as the top undergraduate in Economics at UNT. I later returned to UNT to begin my graduate studies. During my graduate studies at UNT I researched the high school dropout rate in the state of Texas, which has one of the highest dropout rates in the nation. Using econometrics, I determined which factors can best predict the dropout rate for a Texas high school in order to create effective policies aimed at increasing the number of students who complete their high school education. In May of 2010, I completed the master's program and earned an M.S. in Economic Research. I look forward to further studying economics as it applies to education during my doctoral study at MSU. The Economics of Education program at MSU offers me the perfect opportunity and environment to accomplish my goals. I am looking forward to conducting further research in economics as it applies to education during my doctoral study at MSU.

 

Department of Economics; litwokda@msu.edu

Daniel Litwok is a Ph.D. candidate in the Economics Department.  His current research focuses on the economics of juvenile crime.  He applies the tools of labor economics to understand the production of juvenile crime, the response of juvenile criminals to incentives, and the long-term effects of involvement with the juvenile justice system.  For more information visit sites.google.com/site/daniellitwok.

 

brummet

 

Measurement in Quantitative Methods, Agricultural Economics; smartfra@msu.edu

Francis Smart received his B.S. in economics and M.S. in applied economics from Montana State University and is currently pursuing a joint Ph.D. in Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics as well as a Ph.D. in Measurement and Quantitative Methods in Education. He has a diverse range of interests including production and technology adoption under risk aversion, migrant educational choices as well as educational value added methods.

 

Admitted 2011

 

brummet

 

Education Policy, College of Education; creedben@msu.edu

Ben earned a B.A in Philosophy from Tulane University and recently completed an M.A. in International Education Policy and Management from Vanderbilt University. During his time at Vanderbilt, he interned at the Korean Education Policy Institute, co-founded a working group dedicated to studying the educational issues facing the Roma population in Europe, and worked with a member of the Kenyan Ministry of Education to help develop a study of the English language policy in Kenya.

Through this work, Ben has become interested in the intersection and interaction of research and policy in developing countries. He is also interested in exploring the application of economic methodologies to the research being performed in developing countries.

enayati

 

Department of Economics; enayatih@msu.edu

I am a labor economist with a research focus in the economics of education, specifically special education programs. My research relies on the methodological approaches developed in labor economics and, more broadly, applied microeconomics to examine the impact of elementary and secondary school policies on inequalities in special education outcomes. While special education programs offer support to at-risk students, there have been longstanding concerns over inequalities in the determinants for placement into special education. My research addresses these concerns by analyzing variation in federal and state policies to identify variation in special education placement behavior and investigating disparities in the funding, delivery of services, and staffing of special education programs.

Hassan's personal web-site: https://sites.google.com/site/hassanenayati/

.

brummet

 

Education Policy, College of Education; jalilev1@msu.edu

Meg has a B. S. in Industrial and Operations Engineering and an M.A. in Secondary Education with a teaching certificate in math and economics, both from the University of Michigan. After earning her Master's, she taught Algebra at a charter school in Detroit, where she was challenged by the constant lack of resources and the overwhelming needs of her students. She began to be interested in school finance and public funding of charter schools as well as the achievement gap and the plight of students in Detroit. She is pleased to be part of the Economics of Education program at Michigan State, where she hopes to use her engineering and analytical skills to explore more deeply the problems of equity in education.

brummet

 

Department of Economics; khawandc@msu.edu

I studied Economics and Philosophy at Florida International University before coming to MSU in 2010 to pursue a doctorate in Economics.  I specialize in labor economics and applied econometrics, with a particular interest in the effects of environmental inputs on lifetime health and achievement. My primary research uses random shocks to air quality generated by wildfires to estimate the short- and long-term effects on individuals of exposure to air pollution while in utero and in early childhood. To address some of the long-standing issues in the air quality literature, I unite scientific models of wildfires and pollutant dispersion with econometric methods to mimic experimental conditions. Beyond the salient health outcomes, I also investigate whether contemporaneous  and early-life pollution shocks affect educational policy-relevant variables, such as academic test scores and special education classification rates.

 

Department of Economics; narettam@msu.edu

Michael Naretta is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics. His research interests include Economics of Education, Labor Economics, Public Economics, and Health Economics. His current work focuses on how increasing principal autonomy through teacher layoffs impacts the distribution of teachers and student performance. For more information, please visit: http://michaelnaretta.com

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; vosters@msu.edu

Kelly earned her B.A. in Economics from the University of Michigan and an M.A. in Applied Economics at Johns Hopkins University. She worked as an Economist at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for nearly three years. Most recently, she worked as an Associate Research Analyst at CNA providing research support for randomized controlled trials and analytic studies in Education. Her current research interests lie in labor economics and the economics of education.

 

Admitted 2012

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; bibleran@msu.edu

Andrew graduated from Brigham Young University with a B.S. in Economics in 2009 and from Ohio University with a M.A. in Applied Economics in 2010. He then began working toward a Ph.D. in Economics at MSU in 2011. His research interests are in Labor Economics and Economics of Education.

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; orourk49@msu.edu

Maggie Brehm is a Ph.D. Candidate in Economics with concentrations in Labor Economics, Public Economics, and the Economics of Education. Her current research examines state responses to federal matching funds with respect to adoption outcomes of children in the U.S. foster care system. As a fellow, she has worked as a research assistant on projects estimating the capitalization of charter schools into housing prices and the effect of teacher incentive awards on student achievement. 

 

Maggie’s personal website: https://www.msu.edu/~orourk49/

 

 

Past Fellows

 

brummet

 

Department of Economics; dieter10@msu.edu

Steve was a graduate student in MSU's Economics Ph.D. program with a major specialization in Labor Economics and minors in Public Economics and Econometrics. He was also a fellow with an Economics of Education Specialization at MSU (funded by the Institute for Education Sciences). Within education, his research has focused on student achievement in elementary and early secondary school. His own current research focuses on racial test score gaps across the achievement distribution.

Steve has recently accepted a faculty position at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

News

HALE grad wins national award for trans* academics study

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Erich N. Pitcher broke new ground by completing the first systematic study of trans* academics while a doctoral student in the Higher, Adult and Lifelong Education (HALE) program at Michigan State University. Now Pitcher’s research is being recognized as the field’s most outstanding dissertation for 2017 by Division J of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Pitcher,… Read More »

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