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Doctor of Educational Leadership

2014 Summer Education Forum

Summer Education Forum 2014

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The annual Summer Education Forum is a unique feature of the instructional program for the Doctor of Educational Leadership, or DEL.   For this second offering of what will be an annual event, Summer Education Forum 2014 shares in the year-long MSU Project 60/50 conversation on the Brown vs. Board of Education decision and Civil Rights legislation.  Summer Education Forum 2014 will be held at the MSU Student Union on June 17 and June 18, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm each day. 

 

Educational Inequality:  Historical Legacy and Local Solutions

 

The Forum theme establishes topics for engagement for each day of the event, first taking up learning and reflection about the 60th anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act, considering how policy and practice persist in limiting access to quality education for marginalized groups, and finally exploring strategies that represent local solutions to entrenched problems.  The Forum design underscores central principles of the DEL: 1) that education leaders need to engage with policy makers and community members in order to strengthen both schools and communities, and 2) that educational leaders need skills to convene and facilitate respectful and productive conversation among diverse stakeholder groups in the service of that engagement.  A two-day event, the Forum targets a set of issues each day, bringing different invited guests for conversation with our cohort members and faculty.  Skilled Facilitator Jim Marsden will lead participants through processes to increase engagement and to ensure open dialogue rather than debate.

 

"What is our shared history of inequality?" is the key question for Day 1 on June 17.  Participants will reflect on the history of civil rights, desegregation, and recent re-segregation. 

 

Terah Chambers, associate professor in the K-12 Unit of Educational Administration, will provide an historical overview at the start of the Forum.  Dr. Chambers' research interests include Post-Brown K-12 educational policy and urban educational leadership.  From 2002-2003 she was a Congressional fellow for the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and a Legal Fellow for the Office for Civil Rights, both in Washington D.C.

 

Erica Frankenburg, an assistant professor in the Department of Education Policy Studies in the College of Education at The Pennsylvania State University, will also speak on Day 1 about her recent work on suburban resegregation of schools.  Prior to joining the Penn State faculty, Dr. Frankenberg was the research and policy director for the Initiative on School Integration at the Civil Rights Project at UCLA.  She recently co-edited The Resegregation of Suburban Schools: A Hidden Crisis in American Education, which DEL cohort members will read before the conference. 

 

The focal question for Day 2, June 18, challenges attendees to think beyond the present, "What can we do locally?"  Policies made elsewhere and structural conditions beyond the control of education practitioners have broad implications for our daily work, so participants will be invited to consider local solutions and strategies with promise to improve educational equity.  Participants will consider a range of problems resulting from high stakes testing, suspension and expulsion policies, and practices for special populations of learners, among others.

 

Joseph Martineau, Michigan Deputy Superintendent for Accountability Services, will speak on Day 2.  He is responsible for developing and administering assessment and accountability programs including the Michigan Educational Assessment Program and the Merit Examination, Assessment of Students with Disabilities, and the Assessment of English Language Learners.

 

Other invited guests will provide perspectives on the Day 2 topics.

Education Forum 2013

The Department of Educational Administration at Michigan State University launched a new terminal degree program for advanced educational leaders, the Doctor of Educational Leadership. In June, the DEL hosts the Inaugural Education Forum as a unique feature of the instructional program.

The K-12 Unit of the Department of Educational Administration hosts the inaugural Education Forum on June 18 and 19 at the Kellogg Conference Center, from 9:00am to 4:00pm each day. The Education Forum is an annual event of the instructional program for the Doctor of Educational Leadership (DEL) program launched this year to provide a relevant and rigorous terminal degree for advanced educational leaders.

 

Education, Community, and Democracy

 

The Forum theme "Education, Community, and Democracy" reflects key values of the DEL. The Forum design underscores central principles of DEL: that education leaders need to engage with community members in order to strengthen both schools and communities and that educational leaders need skills to convene and facilitate respectful and productive conversation among diverse stakeholder groups in the service of that engagement. A two-day event, the Forum targets one of these areas each day, bringing different invited guests for conversation with our cohort members and faculty. Skilled facilitator Jim Marsden will lead participants through processes to increase engagement and to ensure open dialogue rather than debate.

 

Civic Action is the focus of the Forum on June 18, 2013. Dr. Mark Warren, author of A Match on Dry Grass, will set the context of "community" and share his research on community groups that have organized to improve schools. Conversations in large and small groups will draw forth stories and knowledge from those in the room related to successful efforts and those that have stalled. Participants will leave the meeting with a better understanding of what community organizing requires and with ideas for possible catalysts for civic action in their own communities.  

 

Civic Discourse is the focus of the Forum on June 19, 2013.  Dr. Mark Warren will again set the "community" context for the day and bring forth summary ideas from the previous day in conversations about civic action. Brief presentations will follow including comments by College of Education faculty and state policy actors on the shift in policy control from local education agents to state agents. Participants, representing a broad range of stakeholders, will be asked to share their diverse perspectives and to listen openly to those of others. Movement between small and large group conversations will support deep inquiry into the complex policy issues undertaken.  Those in attendance will leave the meeting with an appreciation for multiple perspectives and will have considered opportunities to support civic discourse in their own environments.  

Forum Facilitator

Jim Marsden

Jim Marsden is Lean In's founder. Prior to starting Lean In in 2008, Jim led a variety of large and small scale organizational development initiatives within the Hewlett Packard Company. In Jim's 19 years with HP, he worked across businesses, countries and cultures in a variety of roles spanning organizational development, business team management, strategic planning and marketing management. He helped HP to create and develop businesses and manage organizational transitions that produced breakthroughs in innovation, new levels of business performance and sustained cultural change.

 

Forum Speaker

 

Dr. Mark Warren

Mark Warren is a sociologist concerned with the revitalization of American democratic and community life. An associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and Public Affairs at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Mark studies efforts to strengthen institutions that anchor inner-city communities—churches, schools, and other community-based organizations—and to build broad-based alliances among these institutions and across race and social class. Mark teaches classes on community organizing for education reform, social capital, and qualitative interviewing, and is committed to using the results of scholarly research to advance democratic practice and social justice.

 

A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing as a Catalyst for School Reform

In  A Match on Dry Grass, Mark and his colleagues argue that community organizing represents a fresh and promising approach to school reform as part of a broader agenda to build power for low-income communities and address the profound social inequalities that affect the education of children. Based on a comprehensive national study, the book presents rich and compelling case studies of prominent organizing efforts in Chicago, New York City, Los Angeles, Denver, San Jose, and the Mississippi Delta. The authors show how organizing groups build the participation and leadership of parents and students so they can become powerful actors in school improvement efforts. They also identify promising ways to overcome divisions and create the collaborations between educators and community residents required for deep and sustainable school reform. Identifying the key processes that create strong connections between schools and communities, Warren, Mapp, and their collaborators show how community organizing builds powerful relationships that lead to the transformational change necessary to advance educational equity and a robust democracy.

 

Warren, M., Mapp, K., & The Community Organizing and School Reform Project 

      (2011). A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing as a Catalyst for School Reform.

      New York: Oxford University Press.